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Environmental, Campaign & Website News > Environmental News Network News Summary (2nd-24th April)

Environmental News Network News Summary (2nd-24th April)

Date : 24th Apr 2002, Source : ENN

2nd April 2002

U.S. GOVERNMENT STUDY SAYS ALASKA DRILLING IS HARMFUL

Opening Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling could harm caribou, snow geese, and other wildlife, a new U.S. government study said Friday, despite the Bush administration's assurances that oil exploration would have little impact. The report, written by the Interior Department's U.S. Geological Survey, was published 10 days before the U.S. Senate is due to launch a contentious debate on whether to allow drilling in the pristine refuge on Alaska's northern coast.

Source: Reuters


WORLD ENVIRONMENT AGENCY WOULD EASE CHAOS, SAYS STUDY

A new world environment organization and an international environmental court would help make sense of the more than 500 environmental agreements and agencies now operating around the globe, researchers said recently. Legal and environmental experts from the Tokyo-based U.N. University called on a U.N. development summit opening in Johannesburg in August to weigh creating a global body with powers over the environment similar to those of the World Trade Organization over international trade.

Source: Reuters


NEW HAMPSHIRE PROTECTS 171,500 ACRES OF FOREST FOR LOGGING, RECREATION, WILDERNESS

A nonprofit organization has bought a huge swath of northern New Hampshire wilderness from a paper company for $32.7 million to make sure it does not fall into the hands of developers. The San Francisco–based Trust for Public Land purchased 171,500 acres — about one-quarter the size of Rhode Island — from International Paper Co. on Friday. The land includes the headwaters of the Connecticut River.

Source: Associated Press


3rd April 2002

LINKS BETWEEN AIR POLLUTION, HUMAN HEALTH CLARIFIED

In the last 50 years, most of humanity has been transformed into urban dwellers, more at home in the city than any other environment. But this rapid rush towards urbanization has brought with it a host of problems, including air pollution, the consequences of which we are just beginning to recognize. More than 75 percent of all people in developed nations now live in cities, a 50 percent increase since 1950. The developing world is urbanizing even faster, with twice as many people now living in urban areas as did 50 years ago. But developing nations are still more rural, with just 35 percent of citizens living in cities.

Source: David Suzuki Foundation


FLOOD-TAMING U.S. AGENCY A THREAT TO RIVERS, SAYS REPORT

The flood-taming U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is a threat to rivers nationwide with its reliance on dams, levees, and channel-dredging, environmental activists said Tuesday in listing America's Most Endangered Rivers. The Missouri River, focus of a long-running squabble over its dams for flood control and barge traffic, was named the most endangered river for the second year in a row. It was No. 2 in 1998, 1999, and 2000, according to American Rivers, a conservation group that compiles the annual list.

Source: Reuters


CHINA INVESTS IN ELECTRIC CARS TO COMBAT POLLUTION

China plans to invest 880 million yuan (US$106 million) to develop electric vehicles to combat air pollution, state media said on Tuesday. Domestic companies would be funded by the government over the next few years to develop vehicles that run on electricity or other power sources, the China Daily newspaper said.

Source: Reuters


NATION'S LARGEST LEAD SMELTER SAYS IT MET FEDERAL AIR STANDARDS FOR A QUARTER-YEAR

For the first time, the nation's largest lead smelter made it through a quarter of the year in compliance with federal air regulations, the Doe Run Co. said Monday. The Environmental Protection Agency and state officials blame pollution from the 110-year-old smelter for high lead levels found in the town's soil and the blood of its residents.

Source: Associated Press


4th April 2002

AS GLOBAL WARMING RISES, SO DO TREE-KILLING INFESTATIONS OF BARK BEETLES

In Alaska's Kincaid Park, just a 10-minute drive outside downtown Anchorage, the parking lot gives way to a path strewn with wildflowers, huge with the midnight sun's constant attention. The trail winds past vistas of the Alaska Range rising behind Cook Inlet, and your chances for spotting a moose increase with the elevation. The trees tower as their needles exhale their woody scent. Interrupting this serene forest are pitiful patches of sagging, gray trees, defeated by the spruce bark beetle.

Source: E/The Environmental Magazine


ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP SAYS WHITE HOUSE WAS PRESSURED TO CHANGE CLIMATE PANEL CHIEF

An environmental organization has accused the White House of caving to pressure from Exxon Mobil in trying to thwart an American scientist's bid to get re-elected as head of an international climate panel. The Natural Resources Defense Council said the Bush administration was working to oust the existing head of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, atmospheric scientist Robert Watson, at the behest of energy lobbyists.

Source: Associated Press


EXXON VALDEZ OWNER SAYS SHIP SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO RETURN TO ALASKA

The Exxon Valdez should be allowed to return to Alaska's Prince William Sound where it spilled 11 million gallons of oil in 1989, the tanker's owner told an appeals court Wednesday. The Exxon Valdez, which now sails between the Middle East and Asia, has been barred from the sound since 1990, when Congress passed the Oil Pollution Act. The act prohibits any tanker that has spilled more than 1 million gallons since March 22, 1989, from entering Prince William Sound.

Source: Associated Press


SCIENTISTS CONCERNED ABOUT SWIMMING POOL CHEMICAL

Scientists warned on Thursday that high levels of a chemical compound found in indoor swimming pools might pose a risk to pregnant women and their unborn babies. Researchers at Imperial College London said they found levels of trihalomethanes (THMs) a by-product of chlorine, in London swimming pools that were higher than amounts found in tap water which had been associated with health problems.

Source: Reuters


5th April 2002

BIG OIL STILL LUBES ENERGY POLICY

On Feb. 27 Sir John Browne, chief executive officer of BP (formerly British Petroleum) stood before a crowd at the Royal Institute of International Affairs in London and announced that the world's third-largest oil company would no longer make "political contributions from corporate funds anywhere in the world." Through its American subsidiaries ARCO and AMOCO, BP, a London-based company, had dispersed a total of $1,692,740 to candidates and parties in the United States since 1999.

Source: Environmental News Network


CANADA TO TOUGHEN NEW-VEHICLE POLLUTION RULES

Canada said Thursday it will toughen pollution emission rules for all new vehicles, ending a loophole that allowed less stringent standards for popular sport utility vehicles and minivans. The new regulations, announced by Environment Minister David Anderson, will bring standards for passenger cars into line with those of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Source: Reuters


6.2-MILE-LONG OIL SPILL HEADED FOR JAPAN COAST

A flotilla of ships raced Thursday to contain an oil slick off Japan's western coast before it washes ashore, coast guard officials said. The 10-kilometer (6.2-mile) -long spill has been slowly moving toward the coast since it bubbled to the surface from a Belize-registered cargo ship that sank early Sunday off southwestern Japan after colliding with a fishing boat.

Source: Associated Press


SCIENTISTS DOUBT GM CORN FOUND IN MEXICO

Scientists cast doubt on Thursday on American researchers' claims they had found evidence genetically modified corn had contaminated wild maize grown in a remote area of Mexico. Ignacio Chapela and David Quist of the University of California, Berkeley, seemed to confirm environmentalists' fears when they reported finding traces of transgenic DNA in the maize last November.

Source: Reuters


TRUCE OVER CANADIAN RAINFOREST SEEN AS FRAYING

A year after environmentalists, timber producers, native Indians, and the government called a truce in their fight over logging in the Great Bear Rainforest on Canada's Pacific coast, there are signs the agreement is under threat. Green groups marked the first anniversary of the pact Thursday by complaining that the government of British Columbia was not following through on a pledge to help protect old-growth timber in the remote coastal mountain region known for some of North America's most dramatic scenery.

Source: Reuters


DAINTREE OFFERS VISITORS EXOTIC REMOTENESS IN ANCIENT, PRISTINE RAIN FOREST

The 110-million-year-old Daintree rain forest of North Queensland, the second-largest virgin tract in the world after South America's Amazon, beckons travelers with its mystique and history. From the airport, travelers get to first visit the magic of the Mossman Gorge. Some locals say the mist-topped mountains cast a magical spell that lures them along the one-hour scenic drive north from the airport to Mossman, a picturesque township at the foot of the mountains towering above bright green fields of sugar cane.

Source: Associated Press


9th April 2002

DWINDLING WATER SUPPLIES ARE THE WORLD'S BIGGEST CHALLENGE

A lack of clean water will be the biggest issue facing the world in the next 50 years, and governments and business are failing to face up to the challenge, a senior Australian researcher said on Monday. Graham Harris of the state-funded Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) told an environment conference in Melbourne that business needed to understand its dependence on the environment and create a new economic framework that focused on longer-term returns.

Source: Reuters


U.S. REVERSES FINDING OF ALASKA DRILLING HARM, SAYS PAPER

In a hastily prepared report, the Bush administration has reversed an earlier study that concluded that opening Alaska's wilderness to oil drilling could harm wildlife, the Washington Post reported Sunday. The new report suggests that the most likely scenarios being considered for drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should have no impact on caribou, the Post said.

Source: Reuters


NEVADA GOVERNOR TAKES VETO TO WASHINGTON TO KILL NUCLEAR DUMP

Nevada stepped up its campaign against burying nuclear waste in the state on Monday as the governor vetoed a presidential endorsement and activists readied a lobbying campaign to reinforce his action. In February, President Bush picked Yucca Mountain as the place to entomb up to 77,000 tons of spent nuclear fuel that will remain radioactive for 10,000 years. The site is 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas.

Source: Associated Press


BIODIVERSITY UNDER MICROSCOPE AT NEW U.N. MEETING

One of the broadest pacts ever drafted to preserve the planet's biodiversity in species and genetics is under the microscope at an international conference that started here on Sunday. Delegates from more than 180 countries to the two-week U.N.-sponsored conference will delve into subjects ranging from forest protection and species extinction to access to local genetic resources, such as plants used to develop new drugs.

Source: Reuters


HALF OF OIL CLEANED UP OFF SOUTHERN LOUISIANA COAST, BUT WEATHER THREATENS

Half of a 90,000-gallon crude oil spill off the southeastern Louisiana coast was cleaned up by Monday, but bad weather was slowing additional efforts. The oil spilled Saturday from a pipeline into an inlet called Little Lake, about 35 miles southwest of New Orleans.

Source: Associated Press


10th April 2002

SOUTH AFRICA SEES U.S. ON ITS SIDE AT U.N. SUMMIT

South Africa has said it is confident that the United States would not torpedo a global action plan for environmentally sustainable development to be adopted at a U.N. summit in Johannesburg. Environmental groups have voiced concern that the United States and oil exporting nations will try to scale down the World Summit on Sustainable Development's action plan because of fears about the impact it could have on business and profits.

Source: Reuters


ALASKA DRILLING PLAN SEEN HELPED BY IRAQ EMBARGO

Senate Republicans, facing an uphill battle to open an Alaskan wildlife refuge to oil drilling, said Monday that Iraq's threatened oil embargo should help them win new support for the measure. The controversial issue over whether to give oil companies access to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) has taken on new importance due to a 24 percent jump in gasoline prices since early March. Iraq's unexpected decision Monday to halt crude exports for 30 days injected new volatility into the oil markets.

Source: Reuters


'NEW' PESTICIDES AFFECT IMMUNE SYSTEM, STUDY FINDS

Pesticides developed in the hope that they may be safer than older chemicals known to cause cancer may be only slightly better, researchers said Tuesday. They found the compounds, used to protect crops such as pecans, potatoes, and sugar beets as well as protect boats and wood, can damage cells that seek out and destroy microbes and cancer cells.

Source: Reuters


11th April 2002

CLIMATE CHANGE WILL UNBALANCE ECOSYSTEMS, SAYS STUDY

Climate change over the next 50 years will throw delicate ecosystems off balance, reduce the geographical range of many species, and bring new predators and prey together, scientists said Wednesday. Fewer species than expected will become extinct, but their distribution could be radically different in the years to come, which will have unpredictable results for humans, the scientists said.

Source: Reuters


THREE GORGES DAM WILL RAISE TEMPERATURES IN CENTRAL CHINA, METEOROLOGIST PREDICTS

China's Three Gorges Dam, the world's largest hydroelectric project, will create a reservoir massive enough to raise temperatures and force crop changes in nearby areas, a government meteorologist predicted Wednesday. Zhu Changhan, a researcher at the China Meteorological Administration, said temperatures around the reservoir site in central China could rise by an average of 1 degree after the dam's completion in 2009.

Source: Associated Press


GREENPEACE PROTESTS CHILE NATIVE FOREST DESTRUCTION

Greenpeace activists chained themselves to a Japanese ship docked in Chile Wednesday to protest the use of native tree species to make wood chips. The environmental protesters aimed to prevent the Iwanuma Maru' freighter from loading 452,100 cubic feet of wood chips made from prized species found in temperate, old-growth rainforests in southern Chile.

Source: Reuters


12th April 2002

REPORT CITES $54 BILLION IN WASTEFUL U.S. GOVERNMENT PROJECTS

The U.S. government could save $54 billion over five years by cutting spending for coal and nuclear technologies, road construction in forests, and more than 70 other programs that are wasteful and damage the environment, interest groups said Thursday. The Green Scissors report, issued annually by a coalition of environmental and consumer groups, urged the government to reduce spending for several agriculture, energy, public lands, transportation, water, and international projects and programs.

Source: Reuters


EAST AND MIDWEST BASK UNDER SUMMERLIKE WEATHER AS TEMPERATURES SOAR INTO 90s

Strolling through a park with her 6-month-old daughter, April Harrison worried that winter had melted into summer, bypassing spring completely. "I don't want it to be this hot so soon," Harrison said in Albany's Washington Park. "I like it in the 70s. When it gets in the 80s, it's unbearable." For much of the East and Midwest this week, it has been almost that. Summerlike temperatures have people across the region playing hooky, replacing their trousers with shorts, and feasting on ice cream instead of soup.

Source: Associated Press


16th April 2002

CANADA HEADING FOR SHOWDOWN OVER KYOTO PROTOCOL

For months now major world powers have twiddled their thumbs politely as they waited for Canada to stop its endless agonizing over whether to ratify the Kyoto protocol on global warming. But any hope that Ottawa had of stringing along its partners for much longer ended with a shocking bang Sunday when the powerful European Union lost its temper and told Canada to stop pleading for more lenient treatment.

Source: Reuters


GREENPEACE PROTESTERS ATTACH THEMSELVES TO SHIP DOORS IN FOREST PROTEST

Five protesters from the environmental group Greenpeace attached themselves on Monday to the doors of a ship carrying wood they said was from an ancient African rain forest. They vowed not to come down until authorities agree to return the timber to Cameroon. The protesters fastened themselves to the top of the 100-foot-(30-meter-) high stern doors of the ship Roxane Delmas shortly after it arrived in this southeastern English port. Police urged them to come down.

Source: Associated Press


17th April 2002

EARTHQUAKE CYCLE FOUND IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND OTHER STORIES

Powerful earthquakes rip through the Pacific Northwest on a regular 14-month cycle, according to a new study by Earth scientists. But these "slow earthquakes" occur so deep in the Earth that their shaking can't be felt on the surface. A team of geophysicists led by Meghan Miller at Central Washington University in Ellensberg reported in the journal Science that they have detected eight silent quakes in the past decade in the Cascadia subduction zone between British Columbia and Northern California. A ninth temblor began grinding rocks an estimated 20 to 30 miles deep this Feb. 2 beneath Washington's Puget Sound and is still rumbling away.

Source: California Academy of Sciences


GLOBAL WARMING THREATENS MAJOR FLOODING IN THE HIMALAYAS, SAYS U.N.

Nearly 50 high Himalayan lakes could flood their banks in the next 5 to 10 years, sending water crashing down the mountains and threatening thousands of lives, the United Nations said Tuesday. Tests carried out in Nepal and Bhutan found that the temperature has risen by almost one degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) since the mid-1970s, causing snowfields and glaciers to melt and fill the lakes.

Source: Associated Press


SCIENTISTS, ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS ASK BUSH TO END LOGGING ON NATIONAL FORESTS

More than 200 scientists around the United States have asked President George W. Bush to halt commercial logging on the national forests and to begin restoring damaged habitat and native species. "Logging has caused devastating impacts on the ability of our national forests to provide wildlife habitat and economically valuable goods and services," said the letter, sent to the White House this week.

Source: Associated Press


CANADA TAKES SWIPE AT E.U. AFTER KYOTO SHOWDOWN

Canada accused the European Union Tuesday of behaving bizarrely by rejecting Ottawa's plea for a further dilution of the already troubled Kyoto Protocol on global warming. The Canadian government, under heavy pressure from energy producers to follow Washington's lead and abandon the 1997 protocol, last year persuaded its partners to change Kyoto to give Ottawa credit for carbon dioxide absorbed by forests.

Source: Reuters


GREENPEACE PROTESTS E.U. IMPORTS OF TIMBER FROM RUSSIA'S WILD FORESTS

Greenpeace activists demonstrated outside the European Union's representative office in Moscow on Tuesday to protest the E.U.'s continued import of timber and wood products from Russia's wild forest regions. Greenpeace said about 15 percent of Russian wood products exported to the E.U. come from wild forest areas. The group noted that many of these areas should be off limits because the government plans to turn them into national parks and preserves by 2010.

Source: Associated Press


18th April 2002

DEMOCRATS PREDICT ALASKA DRILLING PLAN TO FAIL

Senate Republicans said Wednesday that allowing oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) was a matter of national security, but Democrats vowed to defeat the Bush administration proposal, saying it would ruin an unspoiled wilderness for little gain. A Senate vote on drilling in the Alaskan tundra known as ANWR was expected on Thursday. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle predicted the Republican drilling plan would fail. "I don't know how the final vote will turn out, but I'm quite sure we'll be successful" in blocking ANWR drilling, Daschle told reporters at a Capitol Hill briefing.

Source: Reuters


INTENSE LOBBYING AHEAD OF ARCTIC DRILLING VOTE IN THE SENATE

Despite intense lobbying over oil drilling in an Arctic wildlife refuge, big oil companies largely have kept silent, their attention on exploration elsewhere. The oil industry long has sought to drill for the billions of barrels of oil beneath the refuge in Alaska's northeastern corner. But drilling supporters complain privately that large oil companies have not pushed aggressively to open the site to development.

Source: Associated Press


BRITAIN'S PRESCOTT DAMPENS HOPES FOR ENVIRONMENT MEETING

British Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott tried Wednesday to lower expectations for a world leaders summit on the environment in August, saying some nongovernmental groups were making unrealistic demands. On a visit to Brazil to help draw up an agenda for the meeting in South Africa, Prescott said it would be "disastrous" if the World Summit on Sustainable Development set overly ambitious goals and was ultimately seen to fail.

Source: Reuters


EAST AND MIDWEST BASK UNDER SUMMERLIKE WEATHER AS TEMPERATURES SOAR INTO 90S

Strolling through a park with her 6-month-old daughter, April Harrison worried that winter had melted into summer, bypassing spring completely. "I don't want it to be this hot so soon," Harrison said in Albany's Washington Park. "I like it in the 70s. When it gets in the 80s, it's unbearable." For much of the East and Midwest this week, it has been almost that. Summerlike temperatures have people across the region playing hooky, replacing their trousers with shorts, and feasting on ice cream instead of soup.

Source: Associated Press


19th April 2002

EARTH DAY'S ROLE EVOLVES TO REFLECT A CHANGING WORLD

Leonor Lazarini first heard about Earth Day three years ago. Lazarini is the founder of an environmental organization in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and has been active in environmental issues for more than a decade. It has been an uphill and sometimes lonely battle in a country where, Lazarini says, the government values economic gain over all else, and those who speak out against the status quo risk their jobs. In 2000 Lazarini received an email from Earth Day Network (EDN) the primary coordinating organization behind Earth Day. It explained that millions of people across the globe would be joining together in coordinated environmental action on April 22 and invited her organization to participate. Lazarini accepted immediately.

Source: Environmental News Network


U.S. SENATE KILLS BUSH PLAN FOR ALASKA DRILLING

In a big defeat for the Bush administration's national energy plan, the Democratic-led U.S. Senate on Thursday killed a White House proposal to let oil companies drill in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Republicans failed to get the 60 votes needed under Senate rules to end debate on the controversial proposal and to block a threatened filibuster by Democrats.

Source: Reuters


EARTH SUMMIT 2 IN DANGER FROM DITHERING, SAYS E.U.

A global summit in August aimed at saving the environment while pulling people out of poverty faces failure unless preparatory talks are accelerated, the European Union's top environment official said Thursday. Around 60,000 delegates, including many heads of state, are expected to attend the Aug. 26 to Sept. 4 World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg, South Africa. It falls 10 years after the Rio Earth summit that spawned a range of major environmental treaties.

Source: Reuters


PLANET'S HEALTH SOURCE OF MUCH DEBATE

Life on the planet and the ills that plague it will be marked on Earth Day on Monday with "green events" planned by governments and activists around the globe. But as the 33nd Earth Day on April 22 is commemorated ahead of a huge U.N. summit on poverty, development, and the environment to be held in Johannesburg later this year, there is no "green consensus" on the state of the planet's health.

Source: Reuters


BRITAIN AND INDONESIA SIGN AGREEMENT TO COMBAT ILLEGAL TIMBER TRADE

Britain and Indonesia signed an agreement Thursday to take joint action to combat the trade in illegal timber products between the two countries. The deal commits Britain to revising its current laws with a view to eliminating imports of timber from illegal sources and obliges Indonesia to open its forestry sector to closer independent scrutiny.

Source: Associated Press


SINGAPORE'S LAST UNIQUE ANIMALS FACE EXTINCTION

Singapore's only unique wild animals — one of the world's largest squirrels and a monkey that lives high in the forest canopy — are perilously close to extinction, a researcher said on Thursday. Peter Ng, the director of a museum on biodiversity at the National University of Singapore, said the cream-colored giant squirrel and the banded leaf monkey have fallen victim to urbanization and shrinking forests.

Source: Reuters


22nd April 2002

US SENATE MARKS EARTH DAY WITH GLOBAL WARMING DEBATE

The Democratic-led Senate, which soundly defeated a White House plan to drill in an Alaskan wildlife refuge, is set to mark Earth Day by pressing ahead with legislation to force U.S. companies to report global warming-linked emissions.

Source: Reuters


UN CONFERENCE BACKS INDIGENOUS PEOPLES' DRUG PAYOUT

A global environmental conference Friday hammered out guidelines to encourage big business to pay indigenous communities for the right to use native plants to make commercial drugs and cosmetics. Delegates from 166 countries adopted global guidelines at the end of a two-week U.N. sponsored conference designed to encourage leading pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to strike deals with countries where they use genetic resources.

Source: Reuters


EIGHT "ECO-HEROES" WIN GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT PRIZE

Three North American tribal leaders who led a drive to stop new oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge were among eight "eco-heroes" awarded a top world environmental award Monday. Other winners of this year's $125,000 Goldman environmental prize include a Somali grandmother who has fought to preserve her country's dwindling stands of old growth acacia trees and a Polish conservationist who pioneered the use of eco-tourism to preserve traditional family farms.

Source: Reuters


23rd April 2002

STUDENTS BLOCK CARS, MONKS PRAY ON EARTH DAY
President Bush, stung by a fresh defeat by pro-environment forces in the U.S. Congress, Monday marked Earth Day by repairing a hiking trail and preaching the virtues of conservation in the rugged, snowy Adirondack Mountains. Under fire from his 2000 Democratic presidential rival, Al Gore, and others for abandoning the Kyoto treaty on global warming and advocating oil drilling in an Alaskan wildlife refuge, Bush visited the pine trees and pristine lakes of New York's Adirondack Park to burnish his environmental record.

Source: Reuters


NEW YORK'S PROPOSED RECYCLING HALT ANGERS ENVIRONMENTALISTS

The nation's recycling movement has been steadily expanding for three decades – so much that it has become almost standard practice for people to separate their paper, plastic and glass. But in the nation's biggest city – and the one that produces the most garbage – New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg wants to temporarily do away with most recycling in an effort to close a nearly $5 billion budget gap.

Source: Associated Press


EFFORT TO PRESERVE PUERTO RICAN ISLAND FROM OPEN-PIT MINING PAYS OFF

Beyond narrow roads winding through the mountains of Puerto Rico's Cordillera Central lies a tropical paradise lush with giant ferns, philodendrons and pockets of orchids. Less than a decade ago, this nearly became an eyesore of mile-wide craters dug in a search for copper, silver and gold. But Alexis Massol, a 58-year-old civil engineer, led a community struggle against the government and the mining industry to stop the area becoming an open-pit mining zone.

Source: Associated Press


24th April 2002

CONFERENCE HOPES TO REVERSE SEA TURTLE EXTINCTION TREND

Leatherback sea turtles have outlived dinosaurs, but they may not survive humans, scientists warned Tuesday. The ancient giants, once plentiful in the Pacific Ocean, have plummeted in numbers over the last 13 years from the hundreds of thousands to an estimated 40,000 worldwide.

Source: Associated Press


HOUSE PANEL REASSERTS SUPPORT FOR NUCLEAR WASTE DISPOSAL SITE IN NEVADA

A House panel voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to override Nevada's objections to building a nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain in the state's desert. The 24-2 vote was the first congressional action on President Bush's decision in February to approve the Yucca Mountain site 90 miles northwest of Las Vegas. It signaled that the House was ready to move swiftly to support the president's decision despite Nevada's strong opposition.

Source: Associated Press


CHOLERA KILLS MORE THAN 900 IN MALAWI

More than 900 people have died of cholera in Malawi over the past six months in an unusually severe outbreak of the disease, a senior health official said Tuesday. Richard Pendame, secretary for health, said some 32,000 cases of infection had been reported since the start of the rainy season last November.

Source: Reuters



Document last updated on Tuesday 30 August 2011

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