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Environmental, Campaign & Website News > Environmental News Network Summary (5-19th March)

Environmental News Network Summary (5-19th March)

Date : 19th Mar 2002, Source : ENN

5th March 2002

GLOBAL WARMING TO RAISE SEA LEVEL SHOCKINGLY HIGH AND OTHER STORIES

Beachfront property may not be such a great investment in the coming decades. New calculations suggest that glacier melt could raise sea levels to drastic heights in the 21st century. As recently as last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that glacier melt alone would be responsible for a rise of 1 to 23 cm in sea level by 2100. Now, using new data from North American glaciers, researchers from the University of Colorado at Boulder calculate that glacier melt could be responsible for a 23 to 46 cm rise by 2100.

Source: California Academy of Sciences


DISCOVERY OF SLIDE-BURIED VALLEY SENDS AFGHAN QUAKE TOLL SURGING TO 100-PLUS

A powerful earthquake sent a cliff tumbling onto a village in northern Afghanistan, crushing houses and killing more than 100 people, officials said Monday. The temblor, which the U.S. Geological Survey measured at 7.2, struck Sunday afternoon, killing one person in Kabul, injuring dozens in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and rattling buildings across six countries of Central and South Asia.

Source: Associated Press


E.U. MINISTERS BACK KYOTO PROTOCOL BUT FAIL TO SET EMISSIONS LEVELS

European Union environment ministers agreed Monday to quickly ratify the Kyoto Protocol on global warming, but failed to agree on their own national limits on pollution emission levels to meet the accord's standards. The 15 E.U. ministers hoped their action would prod other nations to ratify the accord so it can be enacted before a U.N.-sponsored summit on sustainable development August in South Africa.

Source: Associated Press


NEW JERSEY DECLARES DROUGHT EMERGENCY

New Jersey Gov. James McGreevey declared a statewide drought emergency Monday, signing an executive order that empowers state environmental officials to impose water restrictions. The drought-emergency declaration for New Jersey came as communities along the U.S. East Coast struggled with the driest conditions that states such as Maine have seen in more than a century. Such a declaration never before has been made this early in a year in New Jersey.

Source: Reuters



6th March 2002

LAWSUITS MAY BE NEXT WEAPON IN CLIMATE CHANGE FIGHT

Lawsuits may become the next weapon against climate change as impotent, tiny islands, sinking beneath the waves, seek revenge on the rich, polluting nations and multinational concerns they accuse of wiping them out. Law experts and environmentalists say that potential legal action by the Pacific state of Tuvalu against countries like the United States and Australia would be prohibitively expensive, drawn out, and hard to win. But the global attention it could draw to the cause of some of the world's smallest and lowest-lying countries, which fear they could cease to exist if sea levels rise as global temperatures increase, may alone justify the attempt.

Source: Reuters


GLOBAL WARMING CREATES GRIM FUTURE FOR FORESTS

Global warming is becoming an increasing threat to forests in much of the world, paving the way for fires, droughts, and pest infestations, officials told an environmental conference Tuesday. Ola Ullsten, former Swedish prime minister and co-chairman of the World Commission on Forests and Sustainable Development, said the latest evidence indicates that more than half the world's boreal forest could disappear due to the effect of climate change as conditions shift.

Source: Reuters



7th March 2002

STRONG EARTHQUAKE ROCKS SOUTHERN PHILIPPINES, KILLING 4 PEOPLE, INJURING 15

Falling debris killed four people as a strong earthquake rocked the southern Philippines at dawn Wednesday, toppling walls and a water tank in a southern city and causing a power outage, officials said. The quake, with a preliminary magnitude of 6.8, struck around 5:15 a.m. and was centered under the sea about 235 kilometers (150 miles) southwest of General Santos, said Mylene Carlos of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology.

Source: Associated Press



8th March 2002

NORWAY APPROVES CONTROVERSIAL ARCTIC NATURAL GAS PROJECT

Norway's parliament approved the nation's first petroleum development in the arctic Barents Sea, despite fierce protests from environmental groups. The Snoehvit, which means Snow White, natural gas project had the backing of the Labor Party, the Conservatives, the Christian Democrats, and the Party of Progress, with a total of 128 seats in the 165-member parliament.

Source: Associated Press


BRITAIN TAKES FIRST STEP TOWARD RATIFYING GLOBAL WARMING PACT

Britain took its first step toward ratifying the Kyoto protocol on global warming Thursday and urged the United States to drop its opposition to the pact. Environment Secretary Margaret Beckett presented the treaty to Parliament, where it must remain for 21 working days before Foreign Secretary Jack Straw can sign it.

Source: Associated Press



13th March 2002

MEXICAN ENVIRONMENTALIST SPEAKS ABOUT SAVING FORESTS IN HIS HOMELAND

Environmentalism in Mexico has a dim future unless young people are taught to be more aware of their world, said Rodolfo Montiel, a Mexican environmentalist who was released from prison late last year. "I actually see (the future) rather poorly. From what I know, there's not a large scale of activism," he said this week. "We need to change our culture and way of life and look for ways to raise our young people in a culture that has a greater awareness of the environment."

Source: Associated Press


POST-QUAKE RESERVOIR CRACK SUBMERGES VILLAGES IN NORTHWESTERN CHINA

Several villages in northwestern China were submerged when a reservoir bed cracked open after a strong earthquake in neighboring Afghanistan, officials and a state newspaper said Tuesday. No casualties were immediately reported. A 50-yard-wide fissure appeared in the Xiker reservoir on Sunday, allowing water to escape, the official China Daily reported.

Source: Associated Press



14th March 2002

MALAYSIAN STATE BEGINS WATER RATIONING AMID DRY SPELL

Hundreds of thousands of Malaysians in a southern state stocked up on water Wednesday as officials imposed rationing amid a water shortage caused by weeks of drought. Water cuts were scheduled to begin late Wednesday in rural districts of Malacca state, 140 kilometers (87 miles) south of Kuala Lumpur, while more populous areas face rationing starting Thursday night, a spokesman for the Malacca Water Corporation said on condition of anonymity.

Source: Associated Press



15th March 2002

ARCTIC OIL WOULD ONLY SAVE 1 CENT ON GASOLINE COST, SAYS REPORT

Drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) would create only a small number of jobs and provide enough oil to lower gasoline prices by only one penny a gallon, according to a report released Thursday from Democratic lawmakers opposed to opening the refuge. Senate Republicans are expected to try to amend a pending energy bill to allow drilling in the Alaskan refuge, arguing the project would help reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil and create jobs.

Source: Reuters


FORECASTERS SEE RAIN IN EAST'S FUTURE, BUT NOT ENOUGH TO BREAK DROUGHT

Increased rainfall seems to be in store for some drought-stricken states in coming weeks but not enough to end the severe moisture shortage, forecasters said Thursday. "Half of the United States is either in drought or staring one in the face," said NOAA Administrator Conrad Lautenbacher Jr. And he warned that while the forecast is for normal spring rains, that will not be enough to break the drought affecting the East Coast from Maine to Georgia and large areas of the West.

Source: Associated Press



19th March 2002

DESERTIFICATION SEEN RAVAGING FARMING AND WILDLIFE

Desertification is devastating farm production and the variety of plant and animal life in many parts of the world, adding to pressure to produce food more efficiently, delegates at a conference said on Sunday. "We continue to lose good land to desertification through wind and water erosion, salinity, urbanization, and unsuitable farming practices," said Adel El-Beltagy, director-general of the Syria-based International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA).

Source: Reuters


PEOPLE GRAPPLE WITH HOW TO SAVE THREATENED COSTA RICAN WILDERNESS

Climbing a tree with cosmic slowness, the three-toed sloth foraged for leaves on a thickly forested ridge, a vulnerable symbol of this Eden threatened by development, poverty, and greed. Nearby, a luminescent green-and-black poison-arrow frog lingered underneath a wooden stair built for hiking tourists who clamor up to be whisked along steel cables strung between thick, ancient trees.

Source: Reuters



Document last updated on Tuesday 30 August 2011

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