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Environmental, Campaign & Website News > Environmental News Network Summary (29th October-8th November)

Environmental News Network Summary (29th October-8th November)

Date : 8th November 2002, Source : ENN



29th October 2002

MEETING REGULATIONS COSTS LESS THAN EXPECTED

Here's a prediction. After the federal government ratifies the Kyoto Protocol — and Prime Minister Chrétien has promised a vote on it by the end of the year — there will be a lot of noise. Alberta will try to find a way out, and some of the less-innovative oil companies will stir up a tremendous fuss.

Source: David Suzuki Foundation

http://enn.com/news/enn-stories/2002/10/10292002/s_48784.asp


U.N. CLIMATE MEETING IN INDIA DIVIDED OVER KYOTO PACT

The European Union slammed a draft declaration at a U.N. climate convention in the Indian capital on Monday for not mentioning the Kyoto accord on reducing global warming. "The European Union thinks the declaration is not strong enough. It should include the Kyoto Protocol,{ conference spokesman Michael Williams said.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10292002/reu_48822.asp


CONSERVATION GROUP SAYS IT HAS EVIDENCE OF SMUGGLING IVORY TO FAR EAST

A conservation group said Monday it has clear evidence that smugglers are continuing to feed market demand for ivory in the Far East, fuelling a surge in elephant poaching. The London-based Environmental Investigation Agency said it would take its findings to a meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species in Chile next week, which is to consider proposals to reinstate the legal ivory trade.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10292002/ap_48819.asp


KYOTO OPPONENTS WANT TO STALL PLANNED RATIFICATION BY CANADIAN GOVERNMENT

Canada's provincial governments sought Monday to delay the nation's ratification of the Kyoto Protocol to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by proposing a meeting on the matter in January. Prime Minister Jean Chretien has said Parliament would vote on ratifying the protocol by the end of the year. Chretien's Liberal Party holds a solid majority in the federal legislature, making approval likely.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10292002/ap_48818.asp


ITALY SCRAMBLES WATER-PLANES TO STEM ETNA FLOWS

Italian rescue teams scrambled water-carrying planes and dug ditches Monday to try to stem rivers of boiling lava flowing from Mount Etna after a series of earthquakes awakened Europe's most active volcano. While the snaking tongues of magma remained a safe distance from settlements on the mountain, fears were raised Monday after a fresh tremor measuring 3.8 on the Richter scale struck almost directly beneath the volcano.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10292002/reu_48825.asp


30th October 2002

CLIMATE CHANGE COULD COST $150 BILLION AND OTHER STORIES

Storms caused by global warming could cause problems for banks and insurers. They may lose $150 billion per year over the next 10 years unless they start considering the risks posed by climate change, says a report conducted by a United Nations-backed, U.S.-based research firm. At the same time, humanity must work harder to reduce global warming.

Source: California Academy of Sciences

http://enn.com/news/enn-stories/2002/10/10302002/s_48778.asp


DELEGATES DIVIDED OVER DRAFT DECLARATION AT GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE CONFERENCE

Negotiators at a U.N. conference on global warming were deeply divided Tuesday over a draft statement calling for urgent measures to curb emissions of harmful greenhouse gases. After day-long discussions, the negotiators were still wrangling over a proposed declaration that is to be adopted by environment ministers at the end of the 10-day meeting.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10302002/ap_48838.asp


GAS, OIL ESTIMATES IN U.S. WEST TOO HIGH, SAYS GREEN GROUP

The Bush administration's push to open more federal lands in the West to oil and gas drilling would produce a relatively small amount of extra energy for the nation, the Wilderness Society said Tuesday. The environmental group, which opposes additional drilling, said federal studies have failed to take into account whether it would be cost effective for energy companies to develop some of the areas that are now protected.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10302002/reu_48828.asp


31st October 2002

INDIA REJECTS PRESSURE TO DO MORE ON GREENHOUSE GAS

India, one of the world's most populous but poorest countries, rejected pressure Wednesday for poor nations to step up efforts to cut gases that contribute to global warming. Developing countries struggling to feed their hungry produced only a tiny fraction of greenhouse gases and could not afford the cost of extra emissions cuts, Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee said in opening ministerial talks at a U.N. climate conference.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10312002/reu_48845.asp


U.N. SAYS ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTERS COST WORLD $70 BILLION

Crippling droughts, torrential floods, and other environmental disasters will cost the world more than $70 billion in 2002, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) said on Wednesday. Devastating floods — just some of 526 "significant" natural disasters in the first nine months of the year — ripped through parts of Europe, China, India, Nepal, and Bangladesh this year, killing thousands of people and leaving millions more homeless.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10312002/reu_48846.asp


BRAZIL SEIZES ILLEGAL MAHOGANY SHIPMENT IN AMAZON PORT CITY

Environmental authorities seized an illegal mahogany shipment headed for Europe from an Amazon port Tuesday, officials said. It was the second such confiscation in less than a week. Brazil's environmental protection agency Ibama said it seized 61 cubic meters (80 cubic yards) of the endangered tropical hardwood worth an estimated 370,000 reals (US$108,000) in the port city of Belem, 1,500 miles (2,400 kilometers) north of Rio de Janeiro.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10312002/ap_48835.asp


1st November 2002

RESEARCHERS ESTIMATE THAT AS MANY AS ONE-HALF OF EARTH'S PLANTS ARE THREATENED

Human activities are threatening to wipe out as many as one-half of the Earth's plant species, a study suggests. Earlier studies had estimated that only about 13 percent of all plant species are in danger of extinction. But Nigel C. A. Pitman of Duke University and Peter M. Jorgensen of the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis said those estimates did not take into account the plants at risk from environmental change in the tropics where most of the world's plant species grow.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11012002/ap_48864.asp


KYOTO PACT ADDED TO U.N. CLIMATE MEETING DRAFT

A U.N. climate convention revised a draft declaration Thursday to include reference to the Kyoto accord on reducing global warming after some leading groups strongly objected to its omission. "Parties that have ratified the Kyoto Protocol should strongly urge parties that have not already done so to ratify the Kyoto Protocol in a timely manner," the revised draft urged as one of many steps needed to deal with climate change.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11012002/reu_48852.asp


AFRICA'S IVORY WAR TO DOMINATE CITES MEETING

The next battle in Africa's ivory war will be far from the sun-baked savannah where it is usually waged against heavily armed poachers. It will be fought on a diplomatic level in Santiago, Chile, where the 12th conference of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will consider proposals by five southern African countries to loosen the 12-year-old ban on trading ivory.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11012002/reu_48854.asp


CHINESE DAMS, CHANNEL BLASTING MAY SPELL DISASTER FOR MIGHTY MEKONG RIVER

Developers advertise the Mekong River as "Asia's last frontier." Others warn of social and environmental disaster as China dams and blasts one of the world's great untamed rivers, altering the flow to millions of people downstream who depend upon the river.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11012002/ap_48863.asp


VILLAGERS INJURE FIVE FOREST RANGERS WHO SEIZED ILLEGAL LOGS IN CENTRAL VIETNAM

Villagers in central Vietnam attacked and injured five forest rangers who were attempting to confiscate their illegally cut timber, an official said Thursday. Seven forest rangers in Dak Rlap district of Daklak province discovered 10 cubic meters (350 cubic feet) of logs cut illegally by members of the Mnong ethnic minority group and called in three trucks to take away the timber, the government official said.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11012002/ap_48865.asp


5th November 2002

MAJOR QUAKE ROCKS REMOTE ALASKA, PIPELINE SHUT

A major earthquake of 7.9 magnitude rocked a sparsely populated area of central Alaska Sunday, causing some damage to roads but no deaths, the U.S. Geological Survey and state troopers said. USGS spokeswoman Carolyn Bell said the epicenter of the quake was near the Denali National Park, about 75 miles south of Fairbanks and about 175 miles northeast of Anchorage. It occurred just after 1 p.m.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11052002/reu_48879.asp


CHINA ARGUES AGAINST LOOSENING OF IVORY BAN

China, one of the world's biggest markets for illegal ivory, argued Monday against a proposed loosening of a 13-year-old ban on the ivory trade, saying a brief easing of restrictions in 1997 increased illegal shipments to China. The Chinese delegate to the 160-nation Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) meeting in Santiago from Nov. 3 to 15, said China was struggling to control the illegal ivory trade.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11052002/reu_48872.asp


RICH GAVE IN AT CLIMATE TALKS TO PROTECT KYOTO PACT

Rich countries, led by European Union members, said they agreed not to press poor nations to cut their emissions of greenhouse gases after a disagreement threatened to derail the process of tackling global warming. Ministers and delegates from 185 countries ended 10 days of talks at a United Nations conference on climate change in the Indian capital late on Friday saying all parties had emerged winners.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11052002/reu_48874.asp


U.N. EXPERT URGES CONSERVATION OF ENDANGERED SPECIES BEYOND ELEPHANTS, WHALES

A leading U.N. expert on Monday urged the extension of international efforts to protect endangered species beyond what he called "charismatic animals," such as elephants and whales. Klaus Topfer, administrator of the secretary of the Conference of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) said there are dozens of other species that need protection to survive.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11052002/ap_48882.asp


ALASKA QUAKE SHAKES YELLOWSTONE PARK TOO

A big earthquake that cracked roads and closed an oil pipeline in rural Alaska has spawned shudders thousands of miles south in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, researchers said Monday. More than 200 small earthquakes have been detected throughout the park, the team at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations said.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11052002/reu_48880.asp


6th November 2002

ALASKA OFFICIALS TALLY EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE

Alaska officials Tuesday assessed the damage caused by a powerful earthquake that rattled the state's sparsely populated interior two days ago, including cracked roadways, overturned fuel tanks, and contaminated drinking water. A disaster declaration, freeing up state and federal money for assistance, is pending in response to the magnitude-7.9 earthquake, Gov. Tony Knowles said at a Juneau news conference.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11062002/reu_48890.asp


7th November 2002

SCIENTISTS WARN OF ENVIRONMENTAL DANGER OF WILDFIRES

Wildfires like those that ravaged Indonesia five years ago fuel global warming by increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, scientists said Wednesday. The catastrophic fires in Asia destroyed forests and caused losses estimated at more than $20 million.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11072002/reu_48895.asp


8th November 2002

BIO-PROSPECTORS SEEK TREASURE IN AUSTRALIA FORESTS

It's Australia's new gold rush. Fortune-hunting scientists are scouring vast tracts of tropical rainforests for plants to produce new antibiotics and other drugs that could be worth billions of dollars.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11082002/reu_48903.asp


E.U. AGREES TO COSMETICS ANIMAL TESTING BAN FROM 2009

The European Union is set to ban most new cosmetics tested on animals from 2009 and stop their import into the bloc under a deal thrashed out by lawmakers and E.U. governments, officials said Thursday. But animal rights groups remained angry that some tests, which they called the most harmful, would be allowed for longer.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11082002/reu_48909.asp


ILLEGAL LOGGERS ATTACK POLICE, FOREST RANGERS IN NORTHERN VIETNAM

Illegal loggers in northwestern Vietnam assaulted a group of police officers and forest rangers, pelting them with stones and injuring several in a clash over contraband timber, a local official said Thursday. Three police officers were seriously injured and two forest rangers were hurt in the clash on Tuesday, said Lu Van Thung, chief forest ranger of Muong Lay District in Lai Chau, 550 kilometers (342 miles) northwest of Hanoi.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11082002/ap_48915.asp


RARE WHITE RHINOS FACE STARVATION IN ZAMBIA

Zambia's five rare white rhinos are facing starvation due to a drought that has nearly destroyed grazing pastures in the famine-threatened southern African country, officials said on Thursday. The Zambia Wildlife Authority (ZAWA) said the drought had already claimed 48 other wild animals in the Musi-O-Tunya national park in southern Zambia since June.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/11/11082002/reu_48908.asp





Document last updated on Tuesday 30 August 2011

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