Save Our Earth : Campaigning to save the Tropical Rainforests

 
Save Our Earth - Twitter
Save Our Earth - Facebook
Save Our Earth - Add RSS Feed
 
Search


Environmental, Campaign & Website News > Environmental News Network Summary (17th-25th October)

Environmental News Network Summary (17th-25th October)

Date : 25th October 2002, Source : ENN



17th October 2002

AFTER A SERIES OF TRAGIC FIRES, LOGGERS GO ON THE OFFENSIVE

Wildfires ravaging the American West have citizens, civic leaders, and environmentalists searching for answers. Many blame our country's past attitude towards fire, and a U.S. Forest Service (symbolized by the venerable Smoky Bear) that has been suppressing healthy, natural burning for too long. Fuel supplies leaves, underbrush, and other tinder usually consumed in small blazes have instead been accumulating for up to 70 years, and when a spark finally catches, the forest erupts into a destructive inferno.

Source: E/The Environmental Magazine

http://enn.com/news/enn-stories/2002/10/10172002/s_48691.asp


RESEARCHERS WARN WATER CRISIS LOOMS AS COUNTRIES MISMANAGE WATER

Researchers on Wednesday warned the world will face a crisis if countries continue to mismanage water. A report by the International Food Policy Institute and International Water Management Institute examined possible scenarios that could affect the future of water supplies, including a "business as usual scenario" that projects water supplies will decrease and consumption increase by 2025 in many countries, based on current patterns. Scientists deemed it the most likely scenario to occur.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10172002/ap_48738.asp


WYOMING DOCTOR RECRUITS ARMY IN AFRICA TO SAVE ANIMALS FROM POACHERS

Dr. Bruce Hayse doesn't look like a tin-pot dictator. He favors tropical shirts and Western boots, not camo fatigues and a chestful of medals. He drives a muddy truck, not an armored limousine. So why is this middle-aged family physician living on the summit of cowboy chic recruiting his own army 8,000 miles away in the remote and wretched Central African Republic?

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10172002/ap_48735.asp


18th October 2002

NEW ZEALAND PLANS CARBON TAX TO MEET KYOTO TARGETS

New Zealand announced plans on Thursday for a carbon tax that will push up fuel costs but help the country meet targets under the Kyoto climate change agreement. The tax of up to NZ$25 (US$12) a ton of carbon dioxide equivalent will be levied sometime after 2007, and only if the controversial Kyoto protocol comes into force internationally.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10182002/reu_48744.asp


U.S. JUDGE ORDERS RELEASE OF CHENEY ENERGY PAPERS

A federal judge Thursday ordered the Bush administration to produce documents from Vice President Dick Cheney's energy task force by Nov. 5, rejecting arguments they should stay secret because they relate to top advisers. Justice Department lawyers said they would seek a suspension of the order from U.S. District Court Judge Emmet Sullivan, and failing that, would consider appealing the order to a higher court.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10182002/reu_48741.asp


SUPREME COURT SAYS CANADIAN COMPANY CAN CONTINUE GOLD MINING DESPITE MORATORIUM

A Costa Rican constitutional court has ruled that a Canadian company can go ahead with gold mining in the north despite widespread protests and a recently passed nationwide moratorium. The court ruled that the indefinite moratorium on mining that President Abel Pacheco decreed in May does not apply to the mining project of Industrias Infinito, a subsidiary of the Canadian-based Vannessa Ventures.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10182002/ap_48748.asp


ALBERTA UNVEILS GO-SLOW APPROACH TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Alberta released its own plan to fight climate changeThursday, the energy-rich Canadian province's latest move in a battle against Ottawa's decision to put ratification of the Kyoto protocol to a vote. Calling it a 50-year, made-in-Alberta initiative, the provincial government of Conservative Premier Ralph Klein laid out a host of measures to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases with less-stringent target dates than Canada's commitment under the international accord.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10182002/reu_48742.asp


KILIMANJARO'S GLACIERS ALMOST ALL MELTED, SAYS STUDY

Kilimanjaro's already skimpy glaciers are melting so quickly that they will be gone by 2020, U.S. researchers reported Thursday. The researchers, who are racing to glean information from the unique glaciers on Africa's highest peak before they are completely gone, also said they had found evidence of three catastrophic droughts 8,300, 5,200, and 4,000 years ago.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10182002/reu_48743.asp


23rd October 2002

ANGERED BY POLLUTION, VILLAGERS DAMAGE A FACTORY IN VIETNAM

Nearly 1,000 Vietnamese villagers stormed a factory, destroying machines and looting equipment. They were angry over pollution and the stabbing of two villagers by factory staff, an official said Tuesday. Five policemen were injured by flying rocks and bricks as they tried to stop the villagers, said Le Cao Thang, a local Communist Party official near Qui Nhon city in Binh Dinh province in south-central Vietnam.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10232002/ap_48782.asp


U.N. CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS IMPLEMENTATION OF KYOTO PROTOCOL

Government leaders and environmental scientists from around the world will meet in the Indian capital Wednesday to discuss implementation of a landmark treaty that aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and curb global warming. The 10-day U.N. Climate Change Convention will focus on preparing governments and civil societies, especially in developing countries, for the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on climate change, which comes into effect early next year, the United Nations said in a statement.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10232002/ap_48780.asp


PEOPLE TAKE UP MOST OF THE PLANET, U.S. STUDY SAYS

Humans take up 83 percent of the Earth's land surface to live on, farm, mine, or fish, leaving just a few areas pristine for wildlife, a report issued Tuesday said. People also have taken advantage of 98 percent of the land that can be farmed for rice, wheat, or corn, said the report, produced by scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Columbia University's Center for International Earth Science Information Network in New York.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10232002/reu_48772.asp


TWO INDIANS, ONE BANGLADESHI DIE FROM TOXIC FUMES IN SINGAPORE CHEMICAL PLANT

Two workers from India and one from Bangladesh died following suspected exposure to toxic fumes at a private chemical waste treatment plant in Singapore, officials said Tuesday. Eight employees of Chem-Solv Technologies were hospitalized between Sept. 29 and Oct. 4 with fever, headaches, breathlessness, and coughing, said a joint news release from Singapore's Ministry of Manpower and National Environment Agency.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10232002/ap_48783.asp


24th October 2002

OIL SPILLS MAY LINGER INDEFINITELY, SAY SCIENTISTS

Oil pockets have been found just below the sea bed off the coast in Massachusetts more than 30 years after a tanker ran ashore there, raising fears that spills could continue to pollute the environment indefinitely. Scientists thought the ecosystem returned to normal more than 10 years ago and were surprised to discover the oil concentrations were about the same as in 1976, seven years after the ship, The Florida, ran aground.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10242002/reu_48786.asp


25th October 2002

ONE IN THREE PRIMATES FACES EXTINCTION AND OTHER STORIES

A new report paints a bleak picture for the world's primates. One-third of primate species which include monkeys, apes, and lemurs now see extinction looming. The analysis was published by Conservation International and the primate group of IUCN, the World Conservation Union. Since 1995, the number of endangered primates has risen from 120 to nearly 200. Asian inhabitants are the hardest hit, the report says. Russell Mittermeier, president of Conservation International, cites increased human pressures such as deforestation and hunting in Southeast Asia as the main cause of primate demise.

Source: California Academy of Sciences

http://enn.com/news/enn-stories/2002/10/10252002/s_48683.asp


OTTAWA ATTACKED AS IT UNVEILS PLAN ON KYOTO TARGETS

Canada unveiled long-awaited proposals Thursday on how to meet its obligations under the Kyoto climate change accord, but critics immediately slammed the plan as embarrassingly vague. Ottawa is in considerable disarray over Kyoto, which would oblige the country to cut emissions of carbon dioxide by 6 percent from 1990 levels by 2012. Emissions levels by 2010 are in fact predicted to be 33 percent above the 1990 level.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10252002/reu_48802.asp


SENATE PANEL FAULTS BUSH EFFORTS TO REWRITE CLINTON ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATIONS

Hostile to Clinton administration environmental regulations, the Bush White House largely shut out the public from commenting on its reworking of forestry and mining rules that had been years in the making, a Senate panel's Democratic staff says. After a 20-month review of documents, the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee's Democratic staff also concluded in a report Thursday that President Bush's review of a Clinton-era standard to mandate lower arsenic levels in drinking water was a waste of time.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10252002/ap_48808.asp


NEGOTIATORS PREPARE FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF GLOBAL WARMING ACCORD

Negotiators from nearly 185 countries worked Thursday to hammer out the details of implementing a landmark treaty aimed at reducing greenhouse gases that lead to global warming. Behind closed doors, delegates from industrialized countries exchanged views with representatives from developing countries at the annual meeting on the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change in New Delhi.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10252002/ap_48810.asp





Document last updated on Tuesday 30 August 2011

Copyright Save Our Earth © 2001-2017
Copyright of articles, information and news remains that of the owner, and permission must be obtained.