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Environmental, Campaign & Website News > Environmental News Network News Summary (1st-16th October)

Environmental News Network News Summary (1st-16th October)

Date : 16th October 2002, Source : ENN



1st October 2002

SCIENTIST SAYS ICE METEORS A SIGN OF CLIMATE CHANGE

A Spanish scientist says global warming may be to blame for giant blocks of ice that fall from clear skies and rip gaping holes in cars and houses. Jesus Martinez-Frias has spent the last two-and-a-half years investigating so-called megacryometeors — ice meteors — which tend to weigh more than 22 pounds and have been known to leave five-foot holes in houses. He fears the formation of these hailstonelike blocks on clear days could be a worrying symptom of climate change.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10012002/reu_48569.asp


MALAYSIA EXPECTS MILD EL NIñO, WATCHES HAZE

The feared El Niño weather phenomenon is developing in Southeast Asia, but it is mild and unlikely to cause the devastating smog that shrouded the region five years ago, a Malaysian minister said on Tuesday. Drought caused by El Niño in 1997 and 1998 led to forest fires in Indonesia, and the choking smoke spread to neighboring Singapore and Malaysia, costing regional economies $9 billion in damage to tourism, transport, and farming.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10022002/reu_48586.asp


3rd October 2002

HOUSE DEMOCRATS, REPUBLICANS STRIKE DEAL ON FOREST TREATMENTS

Western House members struck a deal Wednesday that could break a deadlock in Congress and speed up projects designed to avoid a repeat of this year's massive wildfires. The agreement seeks to expedite projects to cut down trees in overgrown national forests and federal land, focusing on areas near homes, watersheds, endangered species habitat, and diseased or insect-infested forests.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10032002/ap_48598.asp


COURT RULES $10 MILLION IN DAMAGES FOR GALAPAGOS SPILL

An Ecuadorean court Wednesday ordered an insurance company to pay US$10 million in damages for a January 2001 fuel spill in the pristine Galapagos Islands that threatened its unique ecosystem. The Jessica — a commercial boat insured by London-based Terra Nova Insurance Co. — spilled 175,000 gallons of fuel when it ran aground in the archipelago, located in the Pacific Ocean 625 miles west of the coastline, according to court papers.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10032002/reu_48597.asp


ENVIRONMENTALISTS, FOREST SERVICE AGREE THAT FIRE REPORT WAS RUSHED, FIGURES WERE OFF

A Forest Service report that politicians cited in blaming environmentalists for this year's severe wildfire season was assembled in haste and contains misleading information, advocacy groups contend. The agency reviewed the July report and now says that environmentalists actually are more to blame than originally reported for delays of logging projects that could have reduced the trees and underbrush that fueled the fires. The initial report said environmental appeals delayed 48 percent of the projects; the revised figure was put at 69 percent.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10032002/ap_48602.asp


4th October 2002

CANADA TO CREATE 10 ENORMOUS NEW NATIONAL PARKS

Canada said Thursday it planned to create 10 huge new national parks and five marine conservation areas over the next five years to protect unique landscapes and animals in the world's second-largest country. The total area covered by the 10 new parks will be around 39,000 square miles (100,000 square km) almost doubling the area occupied by the existing 39 national parks.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10042002/reu_48607.asp


KYOTO SPARKS FEAR, LOATHING IN CANADA OIL HEARTLAND

It is a classic Canadian battle, with one region threatening separation from the country, accusations of federal betrayal, and fears that a culture hangs in the balance. But the arguments, over the Kyoto protocol on greenhouse gas emissions, are on the western front this time, and not in Quebec, where a push by French-speaking Quebecers to create their own nation long created painful divisions.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10042002/reu_48606.asp


U.S. GREEN GROUP SAYS DIESEL SOOT IS BIG CANCER RISK

Tiny soot particles emitted by diesel-fueled cars, trucks, and construction equipment are a major contributor to the cancer risk from air pollution, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group said on Thursday. The environmental group said its findings showed that the Environmental Protection Agency should enforce tough antipollution standards for diesel trucks, buses, farm tractors, bulldozers, and forklifts.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10042002/reu_48608.asp


8th October 2002

GLOBAL WARMING BOOSTS CROPS, CUTS NUTRIENTS, SAYS STUDY

Global warming could increase rice, soybean, and wheat production in some areas, but the greater plant growth could also hurt the nutritional value of the crops, Ohio researchers said Monday. The nutritional quality declines because while the plants produce more seeds with higher levels of carbon dioxide, the seeds themselves contain less nitrogen, said Peter Curtis, a professor of evolution, ecology, and organismal biology at Ohio State University.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10082002/reu_48622.asp


LAND BATTLE BETWEEN FARMERS AND FORESTS TURNS DEADLY IN WEST AFRICA

Wielding machetes in Ivory Coast's protected Marahoue National Park, a knot of farmers gathered piles of dead underbrush, cut down a month before and lying flat and brown on the forest floor. They heaped the old vines and bushes at the base of a hardwood tree towering above them. Then one knelt and lit a match. The brush that had once cloaked the rainforest made good kindling. The fire caught quickly.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10082002/ap_48630.asp


CHAOS AS FLASH FLOODS HIT CENTRAL BANGKOK

Ankle-deep floods snarled traffic, delayed school exams, and forced thousands of workers to stay at home in Bangkok on Monday, and although the waters receded by the afternoon, officials said the danger was not yet over. A combination of rain, high tide, and northern floodwaters flowing down the Chao Phraya River into the city saw homes and roads flooded to a depth of up to a half-meter (20 inches).

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10082002/reu_48621.asp


9th October 2002

EXTINCTION THREATENS SPECIES OF ANTELOPE, CAMEL, WATER MOUSE

The nomadic Saiga antelope could soon be taking its last leap, the wild Bactrian camel its last drink, and the Ethiopian water mouse its last dip. All are on the brink of extinction, conservationists said Tuesday. The freshwater gastropod mollusk has already made its salty tearful goodbyes in the last two years, joining the long-departed Dodo bird among the ranks of vanished creatures.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10092002/ap_48653.asp


11th October 2002

E.U. PARLIAMENT PROPOSES TRADING PLAN TO MEET KYOTO EMISSIONS LEVELS

The European Parliament approved a plan Thursday aiming to cut greenhouse gas emissions to below 1990 levels through a trading scheme that will apply to major polluting industries. The European Union assembly voted 381 to 61, with 38 abstentions, passing a first draft of a plan to meet targets for reducing carbon dioxide agreed to in the 1997 Kyoto Protocol.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10112002/ap_48679.asp


15th October 2002

DON'T EASE IVORY TRADE BAN, URGES LEAKEY

Easing a total ban on ivory trading could lead to the devastation of elephant populations in Asia and Africa, conservationist Richard Leakey said Monday. Leakey, who is also a leading paleontologist, said moves by five African countries to reinstate a legal ivory trade at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) meeting next month will lead to an increase in illegal trade.

Source: Reuters

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10152002/reu_48701.asp


GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS OCCUPY SIZEWELL B NUCLEAR POWER STATION

More than 100 activists from the environmental group Greenpeace entered the grounds of the Sizewell B nuclear power plant in eastern England Monday to protest government plans to build a new generation of nuclear power generators. Greenpeace said some 150 activists entered the plant at around 7 a.m., and about 40 climbed onto the roof of the building housing the cooling water pump, unfurling banners reading, "No More Nuclear."

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10152002/ap_48708.asp


16th October 2002

MAROON TRIBE IN SURINAME PRODUCES MAP TO CLAIM LAND RIGHTS, HALT LOGGING

Descendants of escaped African slaves presented Suriname's government with a map showing areas they claim as traditional lands Tuesday, seeking to win some control of the vast forests and protect them from logging. The forest-dwelling people, known as Maroons, have built their own African-centered societies over centuries in the South American country's sparsely populated interior.

Source: Associated Press

http://enn.com/news/wire-stories/2002/10/10162002/ap_48720.asp





Document last updated on Tuesday 30 August 2011

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