Save Our Earth : Campaigning to save the Tropical Rainforests

 
Save Our Earth - Twitter
Save Our Earth - Facebook
Save Our Earth - Add RSS Feed
 
Search


Environmental, Campaign & Website News > Environmental News Network News Summary (3rd-6th September)

Environmental News Network News Summary (3rd-6th September)

Date : 6th September 2002, Source : ENN



3rd September 2002

ENERGY THE CRUNCH ISSUE AS EARTH SUMMIT TALKS RESUME

Ministers at the Earth Summit rushing to agree to an action plan on poverty and the environment were deadlocked on Monday over whether the world needs a target to boost green energy, diplomats said. With world leaders already addressing the summit in a grand conference hall, some of their ministers were under great pressure in a small room nearby to bridge their differences. The future of non-polluting renewable energy is the toughest issue on that table and pits Europe and Latin America, which want a global target to boost such sources, against the United States, Japan, and many developing countries which do not.

Source: Reuters


ARAB STATES RESIST RENEWABLE ENERGY AT EARTH SUMMIT

The United States has taken much flak for not sending its leader to the Earth Summit but Arab leaders are also noticeable by their absence from the talks, stalled by their shared opposition to an energy deal. Ministers at the World Summit on Sustainable Development, rushing to agree an action plan on poverty and the environment, were deadlocked on Monday over whether the world needs a target to boost "green" energy.

Source: Reuters


INDUSTRY UP IN ARMS OVER NEW EUROPE RECYCLING LAW

Europe's food and drink industry is preparing to fight an ambitious new proposal to raise recycling targets for packaging material in the European Union. On Tuesday, the European Parliament takes up a bill that will require EU states to recycle 65 percent of their packaging waste by weight, against a current minimum of 55 percent. The bill also seeks to broaden the definition of packaging material.

Source: Reuters


MORE THAN 150 DEAD, MISSING AFTER S.KOREA TYPHOON

South Korea said on Monday more than 150 people were dead or missing after the worst typhoon in more than 40 years battered wide areas of the country over the weekend. Typhoon Rusa also killed scores of people in North Korea and left many missing or injured, the North's official KCNA news agency said. Troops joined the search for survivors in South Korea after the storm triggered landslides and flooded coastal areas, devastating thousands of homes and cutting off power and water supplies.

Source: Reuters


S.AFRICAN COURT FINES, EXPELS GREENPEACE ACTIVISTS

A South African court fined 12 Greenpeace activists a total of 5,000 rand (US$473) on Monday after they staged a protest at Africa's only nuclear power station in an action linked to the Earth Summit. Prosecutor Liesl America said the 12, who were from nine countries, were ordered to leave the country. They were fined 4,000 rand for entering the security area of the Koeberg power station illegally on August 24 and a further 1,000 rand for failing to disclose the purpose of their visit aboard the Greenpeace campaign ship Esperanza.

Source: Reuters


WORLD OIL SUMMIT LONG ON PLEDGES TO BETTER PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT

The world's top oil producers tried to clean up their image as enemies of the environment Monday with delegates to an industry summit calling for companies to look for cleaner ways to do business. The possibility of war in Iraq and the impact on world oil prices shadowed the World Petroleum Congress, which drew more than 3,000 delegates from 59 oil producing or consuming nations, and top oil executives. For the first time, environmental defenders such as Greenpeace, Conservation International and the World Wildlife Fund were invited to the meetings and delegates pledged to seek cleaner-burning fuels and reduce the gases blamed for global warming.

Source: Associated Press


4th September 2002

EARTH SUMMIT WON'T SAVE PLANET, BUT MIGHT HELP

They flew around the world in pollution-spewing jets, ate expensive food in Africa where many go hungry, and worked out a plan to "save the planet." But experts say a blueprint close to agreement by the widely maligned negotiators from about 190 nations at Johannesburg's Earth Summit Tuesday will not radically change the world. It may, however, help a bit. Negotiators are aiming to help halve poverty by 2015 by promoting environmentally friendly economic growth without repeating the polluting mistakes caused by 200 years of industrialization in the rich West. A dispute over women's human rights was the only outstanding hitch Tuesday, the summit's penultimate day.

Source: Reuters


FORMER EPA CHIEF SAYS BUSH ANTI-POLLUTION PLAN WILL PRODUCE DIRTIER AIR

New proposals to ease air pollution requirements on power plants will produce dirtier air and harm the public's health, a former head of the Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday. Carol Browner, who was the EPA administrator during President Bill Clinton's administration, accused the current government of misleading lawmakers by suggesting that the agency during her tenure sought similar easing of requirements on power plants in 1996 and again in 1998.

Source: Associated Press


RUSSIA, CHINA SAY BACK KYOTO GLOBAL WARMING PACT

Russia's prime minister told the Earth Summit Tuesday that he expected Russia to ratify the Kyoto Protocol on global warming soon -- but it remained unclear just what Moscow's timing would be. China, the second biggest polluter, also told world leaders in Johannesburg it had ratified the accord. As a developing country, Beijing's obligations under the pact are limited. But under a complex weighting system for industrialized countries, Russia's ratification is vital if the accord is ever to take effect following the withdrawal from the deal last year by the United States, the biggest polluter.

Source: Reuters


ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS BACK AMAZON PROTECTION PLAN

Two leading environmental groups and the World Bank threw their weight Tuesday behind the largest-ever tropical forest conservation plan, a Brazilian initiative to give complete protection to 12 percent of the Amazon, the World Wide Fund for Nature said. The World Wide Fund, formerly the World Wildlife Federation, the World Bank, and the Global Environmental Facility -- a fund aimed at helping poor countries clean up their environment -- will contribute much of the $395 million to the plan that will gradually set aside land, reaching an area the size of Spain in 10 years.

The backing by the three international organizations of the Brazilian government's plan was decided at the Earth Summit in South Africa, according to a statement by the WWF in Brazil.

Source: Reuters


U.S. LAWMAKERS FACE TOUGH TASK TO PASS ENERGY BILL

U.S. lawmakers, returning this week from a summer recess, face a tougher task than before of passing a broad energy bill as congressional staff were unable to finalize language on Alaska oil drilling, ethanol use, and other key provisions in the legislation during August. The Bush administration is pushing lawmakers to approve, before Congress adjourns next month, an energy bill to boost domestic energy supplies and cut U.S. reliance on imports from countries like Iraq.

Source: Reuters


ENVIRONMENTALISTS APPLAUD CANADIAN PARKS PLAN

Canadian environmentalists applauded Prime Minister Jean Chretien's promise to boost the size of Canada's national park system by 50 percent, calling it a continuation of a legacy of preservation. Chretien announced the initiative at the United Nations Earth summit in Johannesburg Monday, saying he would create 10 new national parks and five marine conservation areas, building on a parks system he said has become a source of national pride.

Source: Reuters


5th September 2002

GREENS DECRY EARTH SUMMIT OUTCOME, JEER POWELL

The marathon Earth Summit ended on Wednesday with green campaigners heckling U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell and decrying the outcome as a major let-down for the poor and the planet. South Africa's pride at successfully hosting the biggest international event in its history was a striking contrast with the mood of gloom that descended on environmentalists. At a closing session in Johannesburg, speaker after speaker attacked as too weak a plan meant to tackle global problems from AIDS to depleted fish stocks.

Source: Reuters


BIODIVERSITY AND FISH DEALS AT THE EARTH SUMMIT

A sweeping U.N. plan to cut poverty while saving the earth's resources agreed on Wednesday includes measures to replenish fish stocks and slow the rate at which rare species of plants and animals are being wiped out. Many leading scientists and the United Nations itself have painted a gloomy picture of the planet's future. Some experts say up to 50 percent of the world's species could be wiped out by human activity in this century.

Source: Reuters


EARTH SUMMIT WINNERS AND LOSERS

The Earth Summit was slammed by environmentalists and development campaigners Wednesday as lacking much in the way of new action to tackle poverty and environmental degradation. The 10-day conference and its hefty action plan, if followed, may produce some winners and losers, as illustrated by these possible pairs.

Source: Reuters


S.KOREA EYES STORM MOP-UP BUDGET, DEATH TOLL RISES

The death toll from South Korea's worst storm in 40 years neared 150 on Wednesday as the grim search for bodies wore on and Seoul pondered extra spending for the $1.9 billion in damages wrought by Typhoon Rusa. As helicopters carried instant noodles and drinking water to isolated mountain villages in hardest-hit Kangwon province, officials in Seoul said the government was considering drafting an extra budget to cope with the weekend devastation.

Source: Reuters


IRISH NAVY, PLANES TO MONITOR BRITISH CARGO OF NUCLEAR FUEL

Ireland's military forces will monitor a much-feared shipment of British nuclear fuel through the Irish Sea this month, the government and navy confirmed Wednesday. The Defense Department said it had ordered the deployment partly to assuage public fears of a nuclear disaster or terrorist hijacking of the two armed vessels heading to Britain carrying mixed-oxide fuel rods for nuclear power plants.

Source: Associated Press


CALIF. STUDY CONFIRMS "SUDDEN DEATH" HITS REDWOODS

California's mighty coastal redwood trees and valuable Douglas firs are both susceptible to the same "sudden death" blight that is destroying coastal oaks, marking a serious new threat to the state's $1.1 billion timber industry, scientists said Wednesday. Gov. Gray Davis immediately asked President Bush for $10 million to fight the blight fungus, which he said could have a severe economic impact on the state.

Source: Reuters


6th September 2002

GERMANY PUSHES FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY CONFERENCE

Germany is organizing a global conference on renewable energy in the coming months, officials said Thursday, to focus international pressure for binding targets, a goal opposed by the United States at the World Summit. Designed to build on the summit that ended Wednesday in Johannesburg, the proposal also offers German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder a chance to brush up his environmental credentials ahead of national elections this month.

Source: Associated Press


DANGEROUS RECYCLING SAID TO BE POISONING INDIA

The potential dangers of the World Trade Center scrap steel, which environmental groups say is contaminated, highlight a poisonous paradox confronting the world's largest recycler: recycling is not always good. Critics say India has become the developed world's dumping ground, rapidly poisoning itself and its 1 billion-plus people with toxins from both the waste and the pollution from the sometimes dangerous methods used to recycle it. Every year, India imports millions of tons of plastic, steel, other metals, and discarded computers to break down and reuse, often with unskilled workers ignorant of the risks.

Source: Reuters


GREENS URGE PUBLIC PRESSURE AS SUMMIT DISAPPOINTS

Environmentalists who condemn the Earth Summit for doing little to help the planet said Thursday public pressure must be exerted on governments and business before their delegations fly abroad. After 10 days of tirelessly lobbying world leaders and delegates, activists said they failed to win a real blueprint to fight poverty and save the environment at the World Summit on Sustainable Development, which ended Wednesday.

Source: Reuters


GREENPEACE PROTESTS EARTH SUMMIT ATOP RIO'S CHRIST

Greenpeace activists scaled Rio de Janeiro's hill-top Christ statue Thursday and hung a giant banner across its outstretched arms in protest at what they called the failure of South Africa's Earth Summit. Green campaigners decried the outcome of the marathon Earth Summit, known as Rio+10 since it came a decade after the Brazilian city hosted a similar event. They called it a major let-down for the poor and the planet.

Source: Reuters





Document last updated on Tuesday 30 August 2011

Copyright Save Our Earth © 2001-2017
Copyright of articles, information and news remains that of the owner, and permission must be obtained.