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Environmental, Campaign & Website News > Environmental News Network News Summary (24th-30th July)

Environmental News Network News Summary (24th-30th July)

Date : 30th July 2002, Source : ENN



24th July 2002

ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP BUYS TIMBER RIGHTS ON HISTORIC CATTLE RANCH

An environmental group has purchased logging rights on 5,750 acres of a historic cattle ranch in southwest Virginia in a novel approach to conserve wildlife habitat. The agreement is a first for the Nature Conservancy, better known for purchasing major tracts of land outright. The nonprofit organization controls 1,400 preserves across the country. The group’s Arlington chapter is expected to announce the agreement Thursday with the 228-year-old Stuart Land & Cattle Co. near Abingdon.

Source: Associated Press


INDIAN GOVERNMENT SAYS LACK OF RAIN WORST IN DECADE

With a long dry spell preventing planting and ruining crops in northwest India, the agriculture minister said Wednesday that conditions in the country's breadbasket are the worst in a decade. Ajit Singh met with federal and state officials to discuss immediate steps to prevent wide-scale crop failure and food shortages. "If it doesn't rain in the next five to 10 days, the situation will be alarming," Singh told the representatives from 12 states, the worst hit by the absence of monsoon rains and the long dry spell in the agricultural heartland of northern and western India.

Source: Associated Press


GIANT SPY EYE OPENS ON WORLD'S BIGGEST RAINFOREST

Scanning a dense rainforest the size of Western Europe, a mammoth radar system set to crank up this week will spy on drug runners, diamond miners and illegal loggers that infest Brazil's Amazon. But the story behind the $1.4 billion network of radars, control towers and aircraft that form a spider's web over the jungle has its own share of espionage, riddled with allegations of CIA interference, phone bugs, bribes and dodgy diplomacy. Designed by U.S. defense contractor Raytheon Co., the System for the Vigilance of the Amazon, or SIVAM, will fill a black hole in Brazilian surveillance that has exposed its borders to international crime and rebel activity. SIVAM, built under Brazil's most costly defense contract, will scan 1.9 million square miles of the world's largest rainforest, also cataloging its widest diversity of wildlife and pinpointing Indian populations.

Source: Reuters


26th July 2002

RECORD SEA TEMPERATURES THREATEN GREAT BARRIER REEF

Sea temperatures at Australia's Great Barrier Reef last summer were the warmest on record and this year's El Nino event means the risk of mass coral bleaching has increased considerably, scientists reported on Thursday. The Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) has just completed an atlas of sea temperatures over the past decade and amalgamated it with historical data to show 2002 was the warmest year for water temperatures off northeast Australia since 1870. The rise in temperatures around the world's largest living organism coincided with mass bleaching earlier this year that affected around 60 percent of the Great Barrier Reef.

Source: Reuters


29th July 2002

ENVOY SAYS EARTH SUMMIT BACK FROM THE BRINK

Frenetic behind the scenes work has rescued next month's "Earth summit" from the brink of failure, but negotiators would achieve even more if President Bush attended, a special U.N. envoy said Monday. "President Bush cannot afford not to be there. Nobody will understand if he doesn't show up," said Jan Pronk, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan's special envoy to the World Summit on Sustainable Development.

Source: Reuters


U.S. PROPOSES POLLUTION CUTS FOR MOTORCYCLES, BOATS

The Bush administration has proposed a 50 percent cut in polluting air emissions produced by motorcycles and an 80 percent reduction for gasoline-fueled recreational boats. The standards, which were announced late on Friday by the Environmental Protection Agency, would take effect in 2006 for new motorcycles and in 2008 for boats.

Source: Reuters


WHO SAYS DENGUE FEVER RISK RAISED BY POOR WATER SUPPLY AND TRASH DISPOSAL

Bad water supply and trash disposal in fast-growing cities in poor nations is increasing the risk of a potentially fatal mosquito-borne disease, the World Health Organization (WHO) said Monday. WHO disease-control specialist Dr. Mike Nathan said there is "a clear link" between poverty and dengue fever, which affects 100 countries across Africa, the Americas, the eastern Mediterranean, southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific.

Source: Associated Press


NINE BEACHED WHALES DIE ON CAPE COD BEACH, DOZENS OF OTHERS ARE SAVED

More than 50 pilot whales beached themselves on a stretch of Cape Cod sand Monday and nine of them died before vacationers and other volunteers could push the animals back out to deeper water in a feverish rescue effort. Hundreds of vacationers lined a quarter-mile of Chapin Beach and watched as rescuers tended to the small, glistening black whales, first discovered stranded about 6 a.m.

Source: Associated Press


FINNISH STUDY LINKS POLLUTION WITH HEART DISEASE

Air pollution worsens heart disease by cutting off circulation to the heart, Finnish researchers reported Monday in a study that helps explain why polluted environments aggravate not only asthma but heart conditions. The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that 60,000 people a year die in the United States alone from particulate air pollution — the kind caused when small particles of smoke pervade the air.

Source: Reuters


30th July 2002

POLITICAL CLIMATE COOLS FOR FIGHT ON GLOBAL WARMING

The world woke up to global warming at the 1992 Rio Earth summit, but 10 years on, what some consider the planet's biggest environmental danger has fallen off the agenda of a major follow-up conference. Next month's summit of world leaders in Johannesburg will focus on poverty, not pollution — a worry for some environmentalists who say the poor will suffer first if climate change is not stopped.

Source: Reuters


CAMBODIA PASSES LONG-AWAITED LAW TO CURB LOGGING

Cambodia's parliament on Tuesday set a penalty for illegal logging of up to 10 years in jail, but critics expressed doubts that it will save the country's forests from further destruction. Violaters of the new antilogging legislation can also be fined up to 100 million riel (US$25,600).

Source: Reuters


BUSH ADMINISTRATION TO EXAMINE TOUGHER PENALTIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL CRIMES

Bush administration officials agreed Tuesday to look at extending the time frame for prosecuting environmental crimes and toughening the law to punish would-be polluters even if no harm occurs. Members of a Senate Judiciary Committee subcommittee chaired by Sen. Joseph Biden, D-Del., raised the idea with top environmental law enforcement officials at the Justice Department and Environmental Protection Agency.

Source: Associated Press


BELGIUM BANS SOME FLUORIDE SUPPLEMENT PRODUCTS

Belgium said Tuesday it would ban the sale of chewing gum, tablets, and drops that contain fluoride because officials feared they could cause health problems in people who use them to excess. The ban, the first of its kind in the European Union, will stop short of removing toothpaste with fluoride from store shelves, said Frans Gosselinckx, a Health Ministry adviser.

Source: Reuters


FLOODING IN NORTHERN BANGLADESH KILLS 20, PUSHING SOUTH ASIAN DEATH TOLL TO 465

Swollen rivers broke through embankments Tuesday, drowning 20 young children in flooded villages in northern Bangladesh and raising the death toll from monsoon rains to 465 in the South Asian region. The flooded Brahmaputra River broke through a mud embankment in Gaibandha district, 120 miles north of the capital, Dhaka. At least 11 children were swept away by swirling waters in the flooded villages, relief officials said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Source: Associated Press





Document last updated on Tuesday 30 August 2011

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