Save Our Earth : Campaigning to save the Tropical Rainforests

 
Save Our Earth - Twitter
Save Our Earth - Facebook
Save Our Earth - Add RSS Feed
 
Search


Environmental, Campaign & Website News > Environmental News Network News Summary (10th-23rd July)

Environmental News Network News Summary (10th-23rd July)

Date : 23rd July 2002, Source : ENN



July 10th 2002

GREEN MULTIFAMILY HOUSING GROWS IN HARLEM

An historic groundbreaking recently heralded the future site of an energy-efficient, affordable multifamily housing condominium that will incorporate "smart" technologies for residents. The $40 million development will be the first of its kind in New York City and is expected to be the largest in the United States. The 225,000-square-foot development includes 30,000 square-feet of retail space. Construction is scheduled to be completed by summer 2003.

Source: GreenBiz.com


WORLD SEEN FACING SLUMP AS NATURAL RESOURCES RUN OUT

Humanity is heading for a sharp drop in living standards by the middle of the century unless it stops its massive depletion of the Earth's natural resources, according to a report issued Tuesday. The main culprits are the rich powers & the United States, Canada, 19 countries of Western Europe, and Japan 151 said the study from the respected Swiss-based conservation body WWF International.

Source: Reuters


AFTER YEARS OF DEBATE, U.S. CONGRESS APPROVES SENDING NATION'S NUCLEAR WASTE TO NEVADA

The Senate voted Tuesday to entomb thousands of tons of radioactive waste inside Yucca Mountain in the Nevada desert, rejecting the state's fervent protests and ending years of political debate over nuclear waste disposal. The vote to override Nevada's objections to the waste dump 90 miles (145 kilometers) northwest of Las Vegas cleared the way for President George W. Bush to proceed with the project, which has been studied for more than two decades.

Source: Associated Press


RUSSIA WINS AID TO CLEAN UP NUCLEAR WASTE

International donors launched a 1.8 billion euro (US$1.78 billion) program Tuesday to help clean up the environment in and around northern Russia, which faces a big threat from nuclear waste. A one-day conference chaired by the European Union and Russia announced initial funds totaling 110 million euros for the most urgent projects needed to reduce water and air pollution in the Baltic and Barents Sea regions.

Source: Reuters


ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS TO WORK WITH NATURE CONSERVANCY TO SAFEGUARD ENVIRONMENT

The Army Corps of Engineers said Tuesday it has decided to team with an environmental group to chart river flows, restore wildlife habitat, and conduct experiments around 13 of the nation's dams. Environmental groups already comment publicly on projects by the Corps, which operates 630 dams for flood control and navigation on rivers across the United States. But it is the first time the Corps is creating a program with an outside group (The Nature Conservancy) to improve the health of river environments, said Lt. Gen. Robert B. Flowers, the Army's Chief of Engineers.

Source: Associated Press


FIRMS FAIL TO DISCLOSE ALASKA CLEANUP COSTS, SAYS GAO

Oil firms have not earmarked enough money to foot a future cleanup bill of as much as $6 billion for oil drilling operations on Alaska's North Slope once the now-prolific reservoir runs dry, according to a congressional report released Tuesday. The report by the General Accounting Office (GAO) Congress' investigative arm, adds another wrinkle to a debate over a Republican-backed plan to allow drilling in the nearby Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) that Democrats have vowed to defeat on environmental grounds.

Source: Reuters


SUN SERVES AS MAP FOR MONARCH BUTTERFLIES, SAYS STUDY

The monarch butterfly depends on the sun rather than the Earth's natural magnetic field to help it find its way from Canada to Mexico every year, researchers said Monday. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found monarch butterflies would naturally fly southwest toward their winter home in Mexico under normal sunny conditions. But if the butterflies' exposure to sunlight were altered, they would travel in a different direction.

Source: Reuters


GAO SAYS ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS AREN'T GETTING IN THE WAY OF MILITARY TRAINING

Congressional auditors found little evidence to support Bush administration claims that military training is hampered by laws that protect endangered species and migratory birds. The administration asked Congress this year to exempt the military from some major environmental laws. Two of the proposals, affecting the 1973 Endangered Species Act and the 1918 Migratory Bird Treaty Act, are included in the Republican House version of the defense bill.

Source: Associated Press


U.S. VOTERS WANT STRICT GREENHOUSE GAS CUTS, SAYS SURVEY

Three-fourths of voters surveyed want the U.S. government to require power plants and industry to cut emissions linked to global warming and not rely on voluntary cuts endorsed by the White House, according to a poll released by an environmental group on Tuesday. The Zogby survey of 1,008 likely U.S. voters across the nation was commissioned by the Union of Concerned Scientists, an activist group that backs a Senate proposal for strict cuts in industrial emissions of carbon dioxide.

Source: Reuters


July 11th 2002

LINK BETWEEN NORTHERN POLLUTION AND AFRICAN DROUGHT AND OTHER STORIES

The smokestacks of North American and European factories may have spawned the devastating droughts that killed millions of people in Ethiopia and other parts of the Sahel region of Africa. Scientists have been puzzled about the source of the 40-year dry spell, among the most severe in recorded history.

Source: California Academy of Sciences


CAR BUSTERS IN ACTION

In the fall of 1997, anti-car activists from 50 groups in 21 countries converged on Lyon, France, for a conference that was far more than the usual round of speeches. Although there were some relatively sedate workshops, the real action at "Towards Car-Free Cites" was in the streets, with protesters blocking highways, physically moving illegally parked cars, and even distributing official-looking "tickets" explaining the environmental consequences of car ownership.

Source: E/The Environmental Magazine


E.U. UNVEILS FARM POLICY MAKEOVER, FARMERS CRY FOUL

The European Commission unveiled proposals Wednesday for a radical makeover of E.U. farm policy that would stop subsidizing over-production, but France and some farmers' leaders cried foul. The ambitious blueprint to shake up the much-criticized 40-year-old Common Agriculture Policy (CAP) requires the assent of European Union member states. France reaffirmed its opposition, while pro-reform Britain said it did not go far enough.

Source: Reuters


UTILITIES TO PRESS FOR UTAH NUCLEAR WASTE DUMP

A plan to ship 40,000 tons of radioactive nuclear waste to an Indian reservation in Utah will go forward despite the U.S. Senate's vote Tuesday approving an underground nuclear dump next door in Nevada's Yucca Mountain, the project sponsor said Wednesday. Private Fuel Storage, a group of eight electric utilities, is pushing to store the deadly waste in outdoor canisters on the Utah Indian land until Yucca Mountain opens as the nation's first permanent repository for spent nuclear fuel.

Source: Reuters


HOUSE RESOURCES COMMITTEE APPROVES MAJOR FISHERIES BILL

The commerce secretary would be required to identify the 20 U.S. fisheries with the biggest capacity problems under legislation the House Resources Committee approved Wednesday. The committee voted 23-17 to send the bill reauthorizing the nation's major fishing law, known as the Magnuson Act, to the full House for consideration. The committee's Senate counterpart has not yet acted.

Source: Associated Press


COLORADO GROUP FIGHTS COALBED METHANE WELLS

A citizens' group in western Colorado is fighting a proposal to explore for methane gas in nearby underground coal seams, saying the planned test drilling could devastate the area's water supplies. The Grand Mesa Citizens Alliance, an advocacy group, has asked Delta County commissioners to reject a proposal to drill three test wells, a move that would set the local government against the state and set the stage for a court battle over what has become one of the biggest environmental issues in the Rocky Mountains.

Source: Reuters


COSMETICS FULL OF SUSPECT CHEMICALS, GROUP SAYS

Cosmetics ranging from perfume to hair gel contain chemicals shown to cause birth defects in animals, a group that lobbies on health issues said Wednesday. It listed 52 products that contain phthalates, which are used to make fragrances last longer and to soften plastics. Only one listed phthalates on the label.

Source: Reuters


July 12th 2002

THE SAGA OF THE VERMILION DARTER

Herbert Boschung and Richard Mayden of the University of Alabama stepped into the annals of taxonomic history in 1992 by describing a new species: a 3-inch, brilliantly colored fish they named vermilion darter. The little fish makes its home at the headwaters of Turkey Creek near the small town of Pinson in north-central Alabama. Extensive sampling over a 10-year period found less than 3,500 darters living in small pockets along a 7.2-mile segment of the creek, a tributary of the Black Warrior River watershed.

Source: Birdscapes: News from International Partnerships


GREEN GROUPS SHARE BLAME FOR U.S. FIRES, SAY REPUBLICANS

Republican lawmakers on Thursday blamed environmental groups for contributing to U.S. forest fires that destroyed more than 3.1 million acres this year by blocking federal attempts to thin undergrowth. Green groups and the timber industry disagree on when brush and small trees should be removed from federal forests to reduce the risk of wildfires.

Source: Reuters


DEMOCRATS CALL BUSH GLOBAL WARMING PLAN "BALONEY"

Senate Democrats dismissed the Bush administration's plan for voluntary cuts in U.S. greenhouse gas emissions as "baloney" Thursday and said it will not help slow global warming. The White House plan depends on U.S. companies to voluntarily curb industrial emissions of carbon dioxide and links reduction targets to American economic growth. Democrats prefer a mandatory approach that dictates specific cuts.

Source: Reuters


CHINA CONSIDERS RADICAL PLAN FOR SAVING ALMOST EXTINCT RIVER DOLPHINS

Scientists in China are preparing a drastic rescue plan for one of the planet's rarest animals: a dolphin with the misfortune of living in one of China's busiest and most polluted rivers. The plan calls for professional fishers to round up all the fewer than 100 Yangtze River dolphins, one of only four freshwater dolphin species in the world. The captured dolphins would then be released in a protected reserve.

Source: Associated Press


LAWMAKERS QUESTION WHETHER SPEEDIER NUCLEAR WASTE CLEANUPS WOULD LEAVE CONTAMINATION

Senators and several state officials said Thursday they fear an Energy Department attempt to speed the cleanup of waste from decades of nuclear weapons production may leave the sites still contaminated. The Bush administration, in an attempt to accelerate and cut the cost of such cleanups, announced earlier this year it would give preference in distributing money to locations that agree to commit to a quicker cleanup.

Source: Associated Press


EUROPEAN SEAL VIRUS REACHES EPIDEMIC SCALE WITH MORE THAN 1,200 DEAD SINCE MAY

A deadly seal virus is sweeping across the seas of northern Europe and is threatening to match the devastating epidemic of 14 years ago that wiped out half the seal population in those waters, said an international study released Thursday. Scientific tests on the carcasses confirm the phocine distemper virus, which does not affect humans, has infected seal communities in Denmark, Sweden, and the Netherlands, said the study published in the journal Science.

Source: Reuters


SEVERAL EASTERN STATES RELEASE POPPY-SEED-SIZED BEETLES TO SAVE HEMLOCK TREES

A growing army of ladybugs is at war in East Coast forests, charged with devouring a nasty foe of the Eastern hemlock. The predatory black ladybird beetle, a cousin to the cute, red-and-black dotted variety, is the size of a poppy seed. Scientists hope the beetles will someday prove the cure for the hemlock woolly adelgid, a ravenous insect that is threatening the survival of the prized shade trees.

Source: Associated Press


ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS SEEK PRAIRIE DOG PROTECTION

Seven U.S. environmental groups Thursday urged the federal government to list the white-tailed prairie dog as threatened or endangered, saying plague, oil and gas drilling, and suburban sprawl are decimating the species. If the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service takes up the cause, the white-tailed prairie dog would become the fourth of five prairie dog species to be listed or granted worthy of listing under the Endangered Species Act because so much of the animal's habitat has disappeared.

Source: Reuters


CHINA CLOSES DOWN 823 POLLUTING BUSINESSES, SAYS GOVERNMENT

The government has shut down 823 businesses accused of polluting China as part of a nationwide environmental campaign, the official Xinhua News Agency said Thursday. At the same time, 283 people suspected of illegally discharging pollutants have been investigated, the State Environmental Protection Administration reported.

Source: Associated Press


July 16th 2002

PROTESTERS' MESSAGE LOST ON THE MEDIA

When thousands of citizens marched down the streets of Calgary to protest the meeting of leaders from eight of the world's wealthiest nations, they were largely portrayed in the media as wacko hippies. Yet at the same time, one of the largest corporate scandals in history was taking place. Why didn't the media pick up on the connection?

Source: David Suzuki Foundation


HOSTAGES, FARMERS FREED IN MEXICO AIRPORT DISPUTE

Mexican farmers fighting plans to build an international airport on their land freed all 19 of their government hostages Monday as a four-day standoff with riot police neared a peaceful end. The hostages were set free from the small town of San Salvador Atenco outside Mexico City after the government agreed to the farmers' demands for the release of a dozen men arrested in violent street clashes with police last Thursday.

Source: Reuters


LABOR OFFICIALS ORDER EPA TO REINSTATE INVESTIGATOR WHO FILED WHISTLEBLOWER COMPLAINT

Federal labor officials ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to reinstate a senior investigator to his former ombudsman-related duties after he filed a whistleblower complaint. EPA said it will appeal the finding by the Labor Department that Hugh Kaufman, a policy analyst for EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, "suffered a continuing pattern of discrimination" over the past several years.

Source: Associated Press


GREENPEACE SHIP HEADS TO OSLO TO FIGHT CO2 DUMPING

Greenpeace flagship Rainbow Warrior is heading for Oslo this week to stop an experiment to dump 5.4 tons of liquid carbon dioxide in the sea off mid-Norway, a climate campaigner said Monday. Truls Gulowsen said Greenpeace was due to host a meeting onboard the ship Wednesday among the Norwegian Environment Ministry, researchers, and environment groups aiming to stop the pilot project, designed to test disposing of CO2 in the ocean.

Source: Reuters


MONTANA PROGRAM REWARDS RANCHERS FOR TENDING LAND, HISTORIC SITES

On Doug Ensign's ranch along the Yellowstone River, cattle graze not far from where explorer William Clark once camped. Not far from Ensign's house, remnants of a frontier fort still stand. For years, the Livingston rancher has worked on his own to balance what he feels is a responsibility to preserve historic areas on his property with his need to use the land for ranching. Now, a new partnership of government agencies, environmental groups, and a Montana livestock organization is helping Ensign and others better strike that balance.

Source: Associated Press


ORPHAN KILLER WHALE SWIMS FREE IN HER NATIVE WATERS TOWARD AN UNKNOWN FUTURE

An orphan killer whale was tagging along with members of her birth pod Monday a day after she return to her native waters from a months-long stay in Puget Sound. The 2-year-old, 12-foot (3.6-meter)-long orca was not intermingling with the eight other whales, but she stayed within calling distance, said John Ford, a whale expert with Canada's Department of Fisheries.

Source: Reuters


FISH FARMERS COMPLAIN ABOUT COMPENSATION FOR FISH DEATHS CAUSED PARTLY BY DISNEY PROJECT

Fish farmers on Monday criticized an offer by the government to pay 5 million Hong Kong dollars (US$641,000) in compensation for fish deaths partly blamed on reclamation work for Hong Kong's planned Disney theme park. The proposed payment would not come close to covering losses, which the fish farmers estimate at 800 million Hong Kong dollars (US$102.6 million) said Yeung Yun-kwong, a spokesman for the Hong Kong Fishery Alliance.

Source: Reuters


July 17th 2002

STUDY SHOWS ECO-EFFICIENCY YIELDS HEALTHY RETURNS ON PHARMACEUTICALS STOCK

Pharmaceutical companies with superior environmental performance have outperformed laggards by 17 percent in the stock market over the past year, according to a new study. The study, by Innovest Strategic Value Advisors studied 29 pharmaceutical companies in the United States, Europe, and Japan.

Source: GreenBiz.com


GROUP SAYS U.S. NAVY SONAR IS A THREAT TO WHALES

An environmental group said Tuesday it might go to court to block the U.S. Navy from using a powerful new sonar which scientists say could injure whales and other marine mammals. "We have to look very closely at the final plan. Certainly seeking relief from the courts is something we'd consider," said Michael Jasny, senior policy analyst with Natural Resources Defense Council.

Source: Reuters


POLITICIANS SAY ADMINISTRATION'S CLEAN AIR RULES ARE UNDERMINING CASES AGAINST POWER PLANTS

The Bush administration's plan to ease clean air rules is undermining enforcement cases against older coal-fired power plants, some senators and state officials contended Tuesday. Federal officials denied the charge. "There is a growing feeling, based on fact, that the administration has sent a very clear signal that polluters can do so with impunity," Senate Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., said at a joint hearing of his committee and the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee.

Source: Associated Press


ENVIRONMENTALISTS CAMPAIGN AGAINST DEVELOPMENT IN ICELANDIC WILDERNESS

Environmentalists launched a campaign Tuesday to persuade the world's largest aluminum producer to pull out of a massive development in the Icelandic highlands. The Icelandic Nature Conservation Association is urging its supporters to besiege U.S. giant Alcoa with emails calling on it to abandon its plans to build a giant aluminum smelter.

Source: Associated Press


STUDENTS BUILD ENGINE THEY HOPE WILL REVOLUTIONIZE THE SNOWMOBILE INDUSTRY

Colorado State University students have built a dramatically cleaner and more efficient version of the internal-combustion engine commonly found in everything from scooters to motorboats to snowmobiles. If taken seriously, they say, it could help overhaul the snowmobile industry and influence the debate on whether to allow the vehicles in national parks.

Source: Associated Press


MEXICO MULLS DITCHING CONTENTIOUS AIRPORT PLAN

After violent protests last week, Mexico's government is considering giving in to the demands of angry farmers who want plans to build an international airport on their communal land scrapped. Interior Minister Santiago Creel said Tuesday the government would begin negotiations with communities affected by an October decree to expropriate their land for the $2 billion airport in Texcoco district, just outside Mexico City.

Source: Reuters


SINGAPORE SHOULD CONSIDER RECLAIMING DRINKING WATER FROM WASTE, PANEL SAYS

Singapore should consider meeting a potential drinking-water shortage by reclaiming water from sewage, a government-appointed panel of experts recommended Monday. This resource-scarce island city-state currently buys more than half of its water from neighboring Malaysia under decades-old treaties which start expiring in 2011. The issue has sparked occasional spats between the two over pricing and other issues.

Source: Associated Press


MINIBUS DRIVERS PROTEST GOVERNMENT BAN ON DIESEL CARS

Minibus drivers and owners protesting a ban on diesel-operated vehicles tried to march on Parliament Tuesday but were stopped by antiriot police. About 300 owners and drivers of the minibuses in which many Lebanese commute to work took part in the demonstration, heading from downtown Beirut's Martyrs' Square toward Parliament, 500 meters (yards) away. Wives and children of the owners and drivers also took part.

Source: Associated Press


CONCERN OVER FOREIGN OWNERSHIP OF KEY PUBLIC UTILITY AIRED IN HEARING

Wilma Davis was taken aback when she read about plans to sell her local water company to a multinational conglomerate based in Germany and operating in many businesses all over the world. "I just could not believe it, that we would let the most precious resource we have and let it be sold to a foreign company," Davis said during Monday night's final public hearing on a petition filed with the state Public Service Commission by West Virginia–American Water Co. and its parent company, New Jersey–based American Water Works Co.

Source: Associated Press


July 18th 2002

STATE OFFICIALS WANT BUSH TO ACT ON GLOBAL WARMING

Attorneys general from 11 states criticized President Bush Wednesday for failing to adopt a comprehensive policy to combat global warming, urging he "rethink" his response to climate change and enact a cap on greenhouse gases. In a letter delivered to the White House, the 10 Democrats and one independent from states including New York, California, Massachusetts, and Alaska, wrote that inaction by the Republican administration had resulted in a confusing tangle of antipollution regulations passed by various states.

Source: Reuters


MALAYSIA LAUNCHES CORAL REEF CONSERVATION PROJECT

Malaysia launched a project on Wednesday to assess the state of the coral reefs dotting the peninsula's east coast, teaming up with a British environmental group to survey the Perhentian Islands near Thailand. A three-month pilot phase, due to start in September, will see local and paying international volunteers plot the state of plant and animal life on and around the Perhentian Islands, a popular spot for divers, backpackers, and local tourists.

Source: Reuters

MANY STATES STRUGGLING TO REDUCE TIRE DUMPS FIND NEW WAYS TO RECYCLE SCRAP RUBBER

At Kirby Tire Recycling, the only sound amid the heaps of millions of tires is the hum from a machine grinding rubber into palm-sized bits. It is the sound of progress being made. Ohio, like many states, is attempting to clean up tire piles that have grown from years of unregulated dumping and to find new uses for worn tires that are discarded each year.

Source: Associated Press


IRISH AUTHORITIES SAY DRUG MAKER SHIPPED HORMONE WASTE TO FOOD COMPANY

Hormone-contaminated waste from an Irish pharmaceutical factory was mislabeled as harmless and shipped to a Belgium-based waste disposal company at the center of a European food scare, Ireland's Environmental Protection Agency said. Drug company Wyeth Medica produced waste containing medroxyprogresterone acetate, or MPA, while manufacturing hormone replacement pills for post-menopausal women at its plant in Newbridge, County Kildare, the agency said.

Source: Associated Press


ENVOYS SEEK ACCORD AHEAD OF JOHANNESBURG SUMMIT

Envoys from 25 nations met in New York Wednesday in hopes of ending an impasse on a blueprint for sustainable development to be adopted at a U.N. environmental summit in Johannesburg opening in less than six weeks. The meeting was called by U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan and South African President Thabo Mbeki, who is hosting the Aug. 26 to Sept. 4 summit — billed as the largest U.N. meeting in history with more than 100 world leaders and 60,000 delegates expected to attend.

Source: Reuters


PERU APPEALS FOR AID AS FREAK COLD SNAP KILLS 59

Peru appealed for international aid Wednesday as it scrambled to send food, medicine, and blankets to southern regions where freak cold temperatures have killed 59 people in what officials say is a harbinger of the devastating El Niño weather phenomenon. "Unfortunately, the number of people affected has risen to 66,000, and 59 people have died, most of them children," President Alejandro Toledo said in a statement.

Source: Reuters


ALBERTA GIVES FARMERS C$324 MILLION IN DROUGHT AID

The Alberta government moved Wednesday to head off a financial disaster in the western Canadian province's drought-stricken agricultural sector by plowing C$324 million (US$212 million) into farm aid. The much-anticipated Farm Income Assistance Program — aimed at Alberta's grain farmers, cattle ranchers, and other producer groups whose businesses are being ravaged by bone-dry conditions — will be funded solely by the province, Agriculture Minister Shirley McClellan said.

Source: Reuters


July 19th 2002

OFFICIALS FROM 27 COUNTRIES REPORT PROGRESS ON RESOLVING ISSUES FOR UPCOMING SUMMIT

High-level officials from 27 countries reported Thursday that they made progress in resolving key issues ahead of next month's U.N. summit aimed at cutting poverty and protecting the environment. The most important achievement of Wednesday's day-long meeting "was the conclusion among many delegates that it was possible to reach an agreement on the outstanding issues," said South Africa's U.N. Ambassador Dumisani Kumalo.

Source: Associated Press


DELAWARE PROGRAM REQUIRES FARMERS TO KEEP TRACK OF ANIMAL WASTE, FERTILIZER

The state is notifying hundreds of poultry growers, farmers, and other land owners that they must comply by Jan. 1 with a law requiring them to track their fertilizer use, part of a statewide effort to reduce farm animal waste runoff. Scores of landowners and farm operators already are complying voluntarily with the state's 1999 nutrient management law, designed to protect the environment by managing the use of animal manure and commercial fertilizers. A five-year plan to phase in compliance with the law begins this week.

Source: Associated Press


FIJIAN LEADER SAYS NUCLEAR WASTE TRANSPORTS THROUGH PACIFIC MUST BE OPPOSED

Fiji called on a group including most of the world's poorest and smallest states to join it in opposing shipments of radioactive nuclear fuel traveling through the Pacific Ocean between Japan and Britain. "We will be asking you to join with us in expressing our outrage and opposition to those who are so willing to put the Pacific and our peoples at risk," Prime Minister Laisenia Qarase said Thursday in a speech to a summit of the 78-nation African, Caribbean, and Pacific group meeting in this Fijian resort town.

Source: Associated Press


RECORD NUMBERS OF HUMPBACK WHALES OFF AUSTRALIA

Record numbers of humpback whales have migrated up Australia's east coast this Southern Hemisphere winter, suggesting the population has recovered since being hunted almost to extinction, a whale expert said on Thursday. However, the protected species still faces hazards, including pollutants, said Dave Paton of the Southern Cross Center for Whale Research.

Source: Reuters


MEXICO TO IMPROVE CASH OFFER FOR AIRPORT PROJECT LAND

Mexico said this week it will better its cash offer and terms to buy land from farmers who object to plans to build an international airport on their communal land. "The plan is very clear; the execution of the construction of the airport will be redrawn and that implies a new price plan, first of all, above everything else," Interior Minister Santiago Creel told a news conference.

Source: Reuters


DUNG-FIRED BRITISH POWER PLANT RUMBLES INTO LIFE

Britain's first ever dung-fired power station started operating Thursday, taking the excrement of nearly 5,000 cows and lighting up homes around the north coast of Devon. There was no fanfare, nor any celebrity opening for the Holsworthy Biogas plant, which will take dung from 28 local dairy farms, using it to generate electricity and heat water for local schools, hospitals, and even a swimming pool.

Source: Reuters


DRIVER FINED FOR RAT POISON COASTLINE POLLUTION

A driver who crashed a truck, spilling 20 tons of rat poison into the sea and polluting a pristine coastal area last year, has been fined after admitting he fell asleep just before the accident. The dyed poison pellets turned the coastal waters bright green shortly after the crash 14 months ago near Kaikoura on South Island, 120 kilometers (75 miles) southeast of the capital Wellington.

Source: Associated Press


SOUTH KOREA BUDDHISTS IN PROTEST MARCH OVER TUNNEL PLAN

Dozens of South Korean Buddhists mixed protest and prayer on Thursday in a slow-motion march against plans to build a highway tunnel through a scenic national park in the capital Seoul. The 70 monks and nuns of the Buddhist Environment Association took more than four hours to cover three km (1.8 miles) in the center of Seoul with a "three step, one prostration" march through pedestrian underpasses and over sweltering sidewalks.

Source: Reuters


July 23rd 2002

WHALE MEAT ON SALE AT ICELANDIC SUPERMARKET CHAIN

Whale meat went on sale at Icelandic supermarkets Monday for the first time in nearly 14 years, as the government said it was just a matter of time before Iceland resumes commercial whaling. The meat on sale at Noatun, which has 15 stores in the south-west of Iceland, is part of an initial eight-ton shipment of minke whale imported under a special agreement from Norway. Iceland's supplies of whale meat all but ran out in 1989, three years after an international moratorium on commercial whaling.

Source: Associated Press


CALIF. GOVERNOR SIGNS LANDMARK AUTO EMISSIONS LAW

California Governor Gray Davis signed a landmark bill Monday making the state the first in the nation to regulate the vehicle greenhouse gas emissions scientists say contribute to global warming. The legislation, which has been fiercely opposed by the auto industry, requires the California Air Resources Board to adopt regulations that would achieve "the maximum feasible reduction" in emissions of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, which is emitted by cars and light-duty trucks, the category that includes sport utility vehicles.

Source: Reuters


AIR POLLUTION CHANGES RAINFALL, MAY CAUSE DROUGHT

Nearly two decades after one of the world's most devastating famines in Africa, scientists are pointing a finger at pollution from industrial nations as one of the possible causes. The starvation brought on by the 1970-1985 drought that stretched from Senegal to Ethiopia captured the world's attention. Before rains finally returned, 1.2 million people had died. Now, a group of scientists in Australia and Canada say that drought may have been triggered by tiny particles of sulfur dioxide spewed by factories and power plants thousands of miles away in North America, Europe and Asia.

Source: Associated Press

COLORADO COUNTY REJECTS COALBED METHANE TEST WELLS

A county in western Colorado Monday rejected four of five test wells to explore for methane gas in underground coal seams, the prelude to an expected court battle on the highly charged environmental issue pitting the county against state regulators. The Delta County on the Western Slope of Colorado rejected the test wells over concerns drilling may hurt the area's water, Delta County Commissioner Jim Ventrello said. The vote was considered a victory for a grass roots community organization, Grand Mesa Citizens Alliance, which campaigned against the wells. The exploratory wells had already been approved by a state board, so the 2-1 vote by the commissioners pitted a local government against the state and set the stage for a court battle over what has become one of the biggest environmental issues in the Rocky Mountains.

Source: Reuters


JORDAN SEEKS COOPERATION WITH ISRAEL TO SAVE THE DEAD SEA

Despite regional tension, Jordan is seeking to revive cooperation with Israel on a project to boost the receding water level of the Dead Sea, the lowest point on earth, officials and an Israeli diplomat said Monday. The surface level of the saltiest water in the world has been receding 1 meter (3.3 feet) every year for at least the past 20 years, said Zafer Alem, secretary-general of the Jordan Valley Authority. If it continues, he said, the Dead Sea and its ecosystem will be gone in 50 years.

Source: Associated Press


EPA PROVIDES $27 MILLION FOR 11 SUPERFUND CLEANUP SITES

The Environmental Protection Agency has cleared payments to clean up a third of the toxic waste sites for which financing had been delayed this year. Agency officials said Monday that $27 million was made available in June to clean up 11 of 33 Superfund sites in 18 states that an EPA inspector general's report identified as having received no money as of May.

Source: Associated Press


ASIAN OFFICIALS MULL SHIFT TO CLEAN ENERGY SOURCES

Energy officials from across Asia gathered Monday in Thailand to study ways to reduce air pollution that leads to global warming, a U.N. official said. Climate experts from the Asian Development Bank are advising participants on how to shift from fossil fuels to cleaner energy sources, said Pranesh Saha, energy chief for the U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific. Some 50 participants from countries across the region are taking part in the five-day workshop that ends Friday.

Source: Associated Press





Document last updated on Tuesday 30 August 2011

Copyright Save Our Earth © 2001-2017
Copyright of articles, information and news remains that of the owner, and permission must be obtained.